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The career of Mr. Arsene Croteau has 
been as fruitful as it has been presti- 
gious. For over 57 years as a teacher, 
lecturer, and author, Mr. Croteau has 
lent his hand in the shaping of literally 
thousands of young people, especially at 
the University of Connecticut (where he 
taught from 1918-1955, and acted as 
chairman of the Modern Languages De- 
partment for 25 years), and at Fairfield, 
where he has served as a professor since 
1955. 

The awards presented him in recogni- 
tion of his numerous and outstanding 
contributions have ranged from honorary 
university degrees, to Les Palmes Aca- 
demiques from the French government 
(1937), and a citation from the French 
Culture Bureau (1968) for his enhancing 
of that country's culture throughout the 
United States. The most recent honor 
came with the establishment this year of 
a $1 ,000 French Prize in his name, to be 
granted to a student at the end of each 
academic year, beginning next spring. 

It is even more remarkable that, in a 
time in our history when the subject of 
and attitudes toward senior citizens are 
given to great debate, Mr. Croteau still 
pursues his vocation with an indefati- 
gable energy and clear-sightedness that 
acts not only as a symbol of charity and 
dedication, but also as a model for all 
young people, who have much to learn 
from the knowledge and experience of 
their predecessors. 




To the achievements, which have gained him so much 
recognition; to the devotion, which has aided so many 
students; and above all, to the man, whose talent has 
enriched all those who have known him, do we gra- 
ciously and gratefully dedicate this book. 



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ORIENTATION 




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Rockefell 
si*i in as Vied 
president after House 
confirmation, 287- 
128. (UPI) 



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NEW 
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15 



<Mth Congress con- 

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Families and friends 
of those men misxing- 
in-action in Vietnam 
picket the White 
House. 



15 




MARDI 
GRAS 



Dr. William D. Cool- 
idge, developer of the 
modern X-ray tube 
and of the tungsten 
filament for electric 
light bulbs, dies at 
age 101. (N.Y.Times) 



BiiThdmr 



Job rally draws 10,000 
unemployed U.A.W. 
members to the Capi- 
tol. (UPI) 



13 



Queen Elizabeth feels 
the pinch: asks Par- 
liament for $1 milium 
increase in her living 
allowance. (N.Y. 
Times) 



Student governments 
at Boston U. and 
Michigan State U. 
cancel scheduled lec- 
tures by Ronald Zieg- 
ler, because he "had 
abridged freedom of 
speech and press 
while in Washing- 
ton." (N.Y. Times) 




Many private college 
fees to rise more than 
101. (N.Y. Times) 



VAlffliTrtie 
Day 




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28 paintings, in- 
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zanne, Renoir, Gau- 
gin, and Van Gogh, 
stolen from Milan 
Museum. (N.Y. 

Times) 



20 



William Colby, direc- 
tor of the C.I. A., 
claims that charges 
against the agency- 
hamper its work. 
(N.Y. Times) 



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24 



Communist-led seige 
of Cambodia gains in 
intensity, Pentagon 
fears its fall. (N.Y. 
Times) 



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ADMINISTRATION 

and J_^ "*^" 
FACULTY 



ADMINISTRATION 



Rev. Thomas R. Fitzgerald, S.J., President; Rev. George 
S. Mohan, S.J., Executive Assistant to the President; Dr. 
John A. Barone, Provost; Rev. James H. Coughlin, S.J., 
Academic Vice-President & Dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences; Dr. Vincent M. Murphy, Associate Dean; 
Rev. Henry J. Murphy, S.J., Assistant Dean; Rev. 
George A. Gallarelli, S.J., Dean of Admissions; Rev. 
George H. McCarron, S.J., Registrar; Mr. William P. 
Schimpf, Jr., Vice-President for Student Services; Mr. 
Henry W. Krell, Associate Dean of Students; Mrs. Anne- 
Marie Samway, Assistant Dean of Students; Mr. Edwin 
K. Boucher, Student Residence Director; Mr. Sam Har- 
vey, Minorities Student Director; Rev. W. Laurence 
O'Neill, S.J., Career Counselor and Placement; Mr. 
James Fitzpatrick, Director of Campus Center. 






28 




MURPHY 





MURPHY 




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O'NEILL 



BOUCHER 





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32 



BIOLOGY 



John E. Klimas, Jr., Professor; Donald J. Ross, Professor; 
Frank J. Rice (Chairman), Associate Professor; William 
Lazaruk, Associate Professor; Theodore J. Combs, As- 
sociate Professor; Milo C. Barone, Assistant Professor; 
Salvatore F. Bongiorno, Assistant Professor; Lecturers: 
Blogoslawski; Lobdell; Smith; Stiff. 






+* ) 




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BARONE 





34 







35 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



Thomas J. Fitzpatrick, (Chairman), Professor; Guy R. 
Barbano, Associate Professor; Stephen J. O'Brien, As- 
sociate Professor; Henry E. Allinger, Assistant Professor; 
Gerald O. Cavallo, Assistant Professor; Kenneth M. 
Kunsch, Assistant Professor; Mohan L. Mehta, Assistant 
Professor; Philip J. Peters, Assistant Professor; Lectur- 
ers: Thomas R. Fitzpatrick, Harvey Goslee, Winston 
Tellis, John E. Delaney. 



FITZPATRICK 







36 





CAVALLO 





ALLINGER 



37 






DELANEY 



38 



CHEMISTRY 



Salvatore A. Carrano, Professor; Joseph E. Boggio 
(Chairman), Associate Professor; Rev. John W. Elder, 
S.J., Associate Professor; Rev. Gerald F. Hutchinson, 
S.J., Associate Professor; Frederick L. Lisman, Associate 
Professor; John C. MacDonald, Associate Professor; Ed- 
mund J. O'Connell, Jr., Associate Professor; A/do Pu- 
lito, Assistant Professor; Bo/esh J. Skutnik, Assistant 
Professor. 



LISMAN 






39 




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BOGGIO 





CARRANO 




40 



_• 



PULITO 



I 






HUTCHINSON 



CLASSICS 



Vincent J. Rosivach, Associate Professor; Robert L. Cox, 
Assistant Professor. 





ECONOMICS 



Joan C. Walters, Professor; Rev. William H. Hohmann 
(Chairman), Associate Professor; Edward Deak, Associ- 
ate Professor; Rev. William G. Devine, S.J., Assistant 
Professor; Edward Heinze, Assistant Professor. 




42 





DEAK 






43 



EPUCATION 



Anthony Costa, Assistant Professor; George Thomas, 
Lecturer. 





ENGLISH 



Rev. John W. Ryan, S.J., Professor; Arthur R. Riel, Jr., 
Professor; Nicholas M. Rinaldi (Chairman), Professor; 
Rev. John P. Mclntyre, S.J., Associate Professor; Rev. 
Oliver E. Nickerson, S.J., Associate Professor; Thomas 
J. Mdnerney, Associate Professor; James F. Farnham, 
Associate Professor; Rudolph J. Landry, Associate Pro- 
fessor; Louis Berrone, Assistant Professor; Thomas M. 
Hoban, Assistant Professor; Rev. Donald D. Lynch, As- 
sistant Professor; Michael F. McDonnell, Assistant Pro- 
fessor; Randolph P. Shaffner, Assistant Professor; Sara 
van den Berg, Assistant Professor; Celia Wells, Assis- 
tant Professor; Leo F. O'Connor, Assistant Professor- 
Rev. Albert F. Reddy, S.J., Assistant Professor; Richard 
J. Regan, Assistant Professor; Mariann S. Regan, Assis- 
tant Professor; Instructors: James F. Mullan; Patricia M. 
Dardano; Lecturers: Alice Cavanaugh; Susan Pascucci; 
Laura Ress; Jacqueline Rinaldi. 



44 






45 





iftN 





HOBAf 











47 







48 






WELL 




49 



FINE ARTS 



Robert G. Emerich, Professor; Andrew McC. Heath, As- 
sociate Professor; Ignor Kipnis, Associate Professor; 
Palko Lukacs, (Chairman), Associate Professor; Peter 
Michael Gish, Assistant Professor; Lecturers: Hartney 
Arthur, Burton Hatheway, Lillian Loveday, Elizabeth 
Mutrux, Robert Mutrux, Inez Ryan, Jane L. Sax, Ger- 
trude G. Sill. 



LUKACS 



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51 







52 



HISTORY 



Daniel Buczek, Professor; Matthew J. McCarthy, Profes- 
sor; Angel Fernandez, Associate Professor; Albert Ab- 
bott, Assistant Professor; George 8. Baehr, Assistant 
Professor; Rev. Richard D. Costello, S.J. , Assistant Pro- 
fessor; Paul I. Davis, Assistant Professor; Richard De- 
Angelis, Assistant Professor; Lawrence J.H. Kazura, As- 
sistant Professor, Rev. James McL. Murphy, S.J., (Chair- 
man), Assistant Professor; Rev. Frederick O'Brien, S.J., 
Assistant Professor; Walter Retry, Jr., Assistant Profes- 
sor, Lecturer: Frank DeStefano. 






MCCARTHY 








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54 







55 










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MATHEMATICS 



Robert E. Bolger, (Chairman), Associate Professor; Rev. 
Anthony J. Eiardi, S.J., Associate Professor; Rev. John 
P. Murray, S.J., Associate Professor; Dorothy B. Shaf- 
fer, Associate Professor; Rev. Maurice K. Wong, Associ- 
ate Professor; Brian F. Dunn, Assistant Professor; Ralph 
L. Fox, Assistant Professor; Rev. Frederick Kelly, S.J., 
Assistant Professor; George E. Lang, Jr., Assistant Pro- 
fessor; Rev. Joseph MacDonnell, S.J., Assistant Profes- 
sor; Edward J. O'Neill, Assistant Professor; Rev. Ber- 
nard M. Scully, S.J., Assistant Professor; Dennis J. 
Korchinski, Instructor. 



SiSLMi 




SHAFFER 



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59 





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KELLY 




Rev. Victor F. Leeber, S.J., (Chairman), Professor; Arsene Croteau, 
Professor; Gerald B. McDonald, Professor; Frank F. Bukvic, Associate 
Professor; Mario F. Guarcello, Associate Professor; Robert M. Fedor- 
chek, Associate Professor; John G. Kolakowski, Assistant Professor; 
Wolfe M. Czamanski, Assistant Professor; Emilio Bejel, Assistant Pro- 
fessor; Helene L. Scher, Assistant Professor; D. Raymond Stabile, As- 
sistant Professor; John E. Velazquez, Assistant Professor; Instructor: 
Robert M. Webster; Lecturers: Thomas DeTullio; Armand Fabbri; 
John Rallo. 




60 







61 








62 







63 



Dr. Phyllis Porter, Dean; Estelle Bernardin, Associate 
Professor; Eileen Crutchlow, Associate Professor; Joan 
Fleitas, Associate Professor; Nancy Hudson, Associate 
Professor; Susan MacAvoy, Associate Professor; Joan 
Mohr, Associate Professor; Carol Ponarico, Associate 
Professor; Sherry Shamansky, Associate Professor; Bar- 
bara Sideleau, Associate Professor; Marge Slater, As- 
sociate Professor; Alice Obrig, Associate Professor. 






64 



OBRIG 





HUDSON 







66 




PHILOSOPHY 



Joseph G. Grassi, (Chairman), Professor, Morns Gross- 
man, Professor; King J. Dykeman, Associate Professor; 
Julia M. Johnston, Associate Professor; R. James Long, 
Associate Professor; Joseph 7. Myers, Associate Profes- 
sor; Lisa H. Newton, Associate Professor; Lik Kuen Tong, 
Associate Professor; Rev. Albert A. Cardom, S.J., Assis- 
tant Professor; Rev. William F. Carr, S.J., Assistant Pro- 
fessor; Donald A. Coleman, Assistant Professor. 




67 




« 





JOHNSTON 



HUM 




68 



NEWTON 



• — > 




CARR 






69 



PHYSICS 



Rev. James H. McElaney, S.J., (Chairman), Associate 
Professor; Evangelos Hadjimichael, Professor; Edward 
A. Harms, Associate Professor; Jerome A. Meli, Associ- 
ate Professor; Victor J. Newton, Associate Professor; 
Rev. James W. Ring, S.J., Associate Professor; Michael 
P. Zabinski, Associate Professor; Abbas Khadjavi, Assis- 
tant Professor. 







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HARMS 




70 







71 



DEW 



POLITICS 



Carmen F. Donnarumma, Professor; Edward M. Dew, 
Associate Professor; Daniel A. Felicetti, (Chairman), As- 
sistant Professor; Alan Katz, Assistant Professor; In- 
structors: Kevin J. Cassidy; Donald A. Greenberg. 






72 






73 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Rev. Thomas A. McGrath, S.J., (Chairman), Professor; Alexander To/or, 
Professor; John J. Boitano, Professor; W. Ronald Salafia, Professor; 
Dorfhea D. Braginsky, Associate Professor; John F. McCarthy, Associ- 
ate Professor; Elizabeth B. Gardner, Assistant Professor; Instructor: 
Jeff Eagle; Lecturers: William B. Goodwin,- Vincent Murphy. 








74 







75 



RELIGIOUS 



V^ \-AAL.l./^V^I 1A\I^ 



STUDIES 



Rev. Vincent M. Burns, S.J., (Chairman), Associate Pro- 
fessor; Augustine J. Caffrey, Associate Professor; Rev. 
Thomas G. O'Callaghan, S.J., Associate Professor; Al- 
fred F. Benney, Assistant Professor; Rev. Richard M. 
Brackett, S.J., Assistant Professor; Rev. Joseph G. De- 
vine, S.J., Assistant Professor; Hugh M. Humphrey, As- 
sistant Professor; C. Michael Thornburg, Assistant 
Professor. 






BRACKETT 




76 







77 



SOCIOLOGY 



Leo F, Fay, (Chairman), Assistant Professor; Arthur L. 
Anderson, Assistant Professor; Genevieve Burch, Assis- 
tant Professor; Harry Fishman, Assistant Professor; Rev. 
Anthony R. Peloquin, O.F.M., Assistant Professor; Kurt 
C. Schlichting, Instructor. 





78 





79 







80 







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TOAST 



TO 



THE 



JESUITS 



By combining well-deserved praise and civic concern, Senior Art 
D'Onafrio and his staff evolved inspiration into actuality in creating 
the first-ever Toast to the Jesuits. This affair, which credited among 
its guests Congressman Stuart McKinney, Bridgeport Mayor, Nicho- 
las Panuzio, and Fairfield First Selectman, John Sullivan, yielded its 
proceeds to the Greater Bridgeport Heart Association. 



9) 



The speaker's platform commanded most of the au- 
dience's attention with Mr. McKinney, actress Barbara 
Britton, and Mr. Carmen Donnarumma of the Politics 
Department, extolling the excellence of both the Jesuits 
and the Toast committee. The highlight of the evening 
was, of course, comedian-impressionist David Frye. His 
expert blending of humor and history provided the au- 
dience with both pleasurable and poignant moments. 







92 







The evening was, from start to end, one of those rare experiences 
where all the people gave of themselves, yet were, in some wonder- 
ful way, enriched. 



93 




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SENIORS 







Gayle Adams 



Preston Adams 



Karen Ahern 



Diane Allison 







Helen Amaral 



Jim Anderson 



Linda Arana 



"Monte" Bahamonde 




Carl Bailey 




Joanne Baranick 





Mike Bailey 




Debbie Barry 



96 






Kathy Barry 



Mary Beese 





Bijou" Beglane 



Beverly Bell 



Gayle E. Adams, 1 1 84 New Haven Ave. Milford, 
Ct. 06460; B.A. Modern Languages. Preston S. 
Adams, 582 Connecticut Ave. Bridgeport, Ct. 
06607; B.S. Accounting. Karen E. Ahem, 37 Wal- 
nut St. Oxford, Ma. 01540; B.A. Psychology. 
Diane M. Allison, 220 High Ridge Dr. Bridgeport, 
Ct. 06606; B.S. Accounting. Helen M. Amoral, 
P.O. Box 178, Newtown, Ct. 06470; B.A. Modern 
Languages. Robert T. Amico, Box 74, Demarest, 
N.J. 07627; B.A. Economics. James S. Anderson, 
22 Sea Cliff Ave. Sea Cliff, N.Y. 11579; B.S. 
Chemistry. Linda L. Arana, 37 Sasco Creek Rd. 
Westport, Ct. 06880; B.A. Modern Languages. 
Brian J. Askew, 2 Washington Court, Stamford, Ct. 
06902; B.A. Politics. Car/ S. Back, Rt. 1 More- 
house Rd. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. Philosophy. 
Carmen M. Bahamonde, 189 Harriet St. Bridge- 
port, Ct. 06608; B.A. Sociology. Carl F. Bailey, 
Filmore Ave. Danbury, Ct. 06810; B.S. Marketing. 
Michael J. Bailey, 16 Laurel Place, Upper Mont- 
clair, N.J. 07043; B.S. Accounting. John A. Bal- 
lard, 701 Randolph St. Falls Church, Va. 22046; 
B.S. Finance. Joanne M. Baranick, 5 Valley Rd. 
Dover, fv\a. 02030; B.S. Mathematics. Lawrence 
Barnes, 625 Magill Rd. Swarthmore, Pa. 19081; 
B.S. Accounting. Deborah M. Barry, 31 Virginia 
Ave. Rockville Center, N.Y. 1 1570; B.A. English. 
Kathleen M. Barry, 258 Gibbs Pond Rd. Nescon- 
set, N.Y. 1 1767; B.A. Sociology. Mary R. Beese, 
250 Manchester Rd. River Edge. N.J. 07661; B.A. 
Psychology. Mark J. Beglane, 68 Larkspur St. 
Springfield, Ma. 01108; B.A. History. Beverly E. 
Bell, 71 Trumbull Ave. Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.A. 
Politics. 



97 






Pamela A. Belletzkie, 43 Garden Drive, Fairfield, 
Ct. 06430; B.S. Biology. Rickey R. Bellitto, 518 
Romanock Rd. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. History. 
Peter P. Berardino, 34 Adams St. Garden City, 
N.Y. 11530; B.S. Accounting. James R. Berg- 
mann, 41 Cobblers Hill Rd. Trumbull, Ct. 0661 1; 
B.S. Biology. Carlo M. Berrone, 1 10 Peck Hill Rd. 
Woodbridge, Ct. 06525; B.S. Mathematics. Rich- 
ard A. Bertone, 1524 Liberty St. Erie, Pa. 16502; 
B.A. English. David Bienashski, 53 Grove St. Port- 
land, Ct. 06480; B.A. Psychology. Jules H. Blank, 
420 Courtland Ave. Bridgeport, Ct. 06605; B.S. 
Biology. Joan M. Blissert, 7 Albermarle Rd. Man- 
hasset, N.Y. 11030; B.S. Finance. Thomas B. 
Bourque, 1629 Main St. East Hartford, Ct. 
06108; B.S. Finance. Catherine K. Boutin, 1586 
Stratfield Rd. Fairfield, Ct. 06604; B.S. Nursing. 
Vincent D. Boylan, 1013 Kennedy St. Falls Church, 
Va. 22046; B.A. History. Eugene Bragoli, 26 
Sherwood Rd. Hampton Bays, N.Y. 1 1946; B.A. 
Psychology. Rosemary Brennan, 7 Colony St. Hick- 
sville, N.Y. 1 1 801 ; B.S. Marketing. Patricia B. Bril, 
984 North Town River Rd. Fort Myers, Fl. 33901; 
B.A. Economics. Harry J. Brix, 32-09 150 Place, 
Flushing, N.Y. 11354; B.A. Economics. James D. 
Broderick, 51 Harriet Lane, Huntington, N.Y. 
1 1743; B.A. Politics. Mildred E. Brunow, Harmony 
Hill Rd. Pawling, N.Y. 12564; B.S. Psychology. 
Paul J. Buccigross, 22 Morseland Ave. Newton 
Centre, Ma. 02159; B.S. Biology. 



98 






Pam Belletzkie 



Rickey Bellitto 




i 




Pete Berardino 



Jim Bergmann 



Carlo Berrone 




Rick Bertone 







Dave Bienashski 



Jules Blank 



Joan Blissert 



Tom Bourque 







Katie Boutin 



"Chipper" Boylan 



Gene Bragoli 



Rosemary Brennan 







Patty Bnl 



Hank Brix 



Jim Broderick 



Millie Brunow 



99 







Bill Bulman 



Joe Buonincontra 



Craig Bursey 



Mandy Butler 




Paul Buzad 





Ed Byrne 





_ -,. .«,„ .V- 



.* - 



.. «f 



.v -«*sss**->>. .<•:-'■" 



'■•' ' 






555 »•'£« \" 



Bert Calabro 



Betsy Callaghan 







J.C." Callaghan 



Rich Canel 



"Gregoire" Cannarozzi 



Mary Beth Carmody 



100 





Mike Caron 



Marybeth Carrie 



^*^-. 







Joe Carro 








Steve Caruso 





Charlie Celavro 



Phyllis Cellini 



William J. Bulman, 562 Irving Terrace, South Or- 
ange, N.Y. 07079; B.A. Politics. Joseph Buonin- 
contra, 442 Szost Drive, Fairfield, Ct. 06430, 
B.A. Psychology. Craig J. Bursey, 4 David Dr. Sim- 
sbury, Ct. 06070; B.S. Finance. Madeline M. But- 
ler, 740 Scrubgrass Rd. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Biol 
ogy. Paul Buzad, Jr., 205 Gairfield Ave. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.S. Biology. Edward S. 
Byrne, 54 Dutch Hollow Dr. Orangeburg, N.Y. 
10962; B.S. Accounting. Albert N. Calabro, 125 
Morningside Dr. Westbury, N.Y. 1 1590; B.S. Ac- 
counting. Elizabeth Callaghan, 452 Berkeley Ave. 
Orange, N.J. 07050; B.A. Politics. John E. Call- 
aghan, 26 Riverview Terrace, Springfield, Ma. 
01108; B.S. Accounting. Richard F. Cone/, 409 
Newton Tpke. Weston, Ct. 06880, B.A. Politics. 
Gregory M. Cannarozzi, 378 North Ave. Wood 
Ridge, N.J. 07075; B.A. with Classics. Mory E. 
Carmody, 32 Vinton St. Worcester, Ma. 01605; 
B.A. Politics. Michael H. Caron, 2 1 Woodland Rd. 
Maplewood, N.J. 07040; B.A. Economics. Mary 
Elizabeth Carrie, 76 Gordonhurst Ave. Upper 
Montclair, N.J. 07043; B.S. Biology. Joseph M. 
Carroll, 253 Walker St. Lenox, Ma. 01240; B.A. 
History. Stephen V. Caruso, 51 1 Lake St. Newark, 
N.J. 07104; B.S. Psychology. William C. Casano, 
43 Maybrook Rd. Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.A. Pol- 
itics. Charles J. Celauro, 548 Nordhoff Dr. Leonia, 
N.J. 07605; B.S. Finance. Phyllis M. Cellini, 79 
Sterling Rd. Trumbull, Ct. 0661 I; B.S. Biology. 



101 



James U. Cesiro, 82 Haddon Rd. New Hyde Park, 
N.Y. 1 1040; B.A. Politics. Keith J. Chamberlin, 79 
Deerfield St. Bergenfield, N.J. 07621; B.S. Biol- 
ogy. Robert T. Checola, 1 1 Lenox St. Worcester, 
Ma. 01602; B.S. Biology. Gabriel Cherichello, 
102 Brookwood St. East Orange, NJ. 07018; 
B.A. Psychology. Patricia A. Chesser, 1 033 Wagar 
Rd. Rocky River, Oh. 441 16; B.A. English. Robert 
B. Gccone, 963 Beach Rd. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; 
B.A. Sociology. Paul C. Cignoli, 5 Old Brook Rd. 
Springfield, Ma. 01118; B.S. Management. Lau- 
ren R. Clancy, 28 Concord Court, Red Bank, N.J. 
07701; B.S. Nursing. Katherine F. Clarke, 1 8 Oak 
Crest Rd. Darien, Ct. 06820; B.S. Biology. Kim M. 
Cloutman, 23 Coventry Lane, Longmeadow, Ma. 
01 106; B.S. Psychology. Patn'ck F. Colandrea, 47 
Alden Place, Milford, Ct. 06460; B.S. Finance. Su- 
san M. Colangelo, 1 3 Chalfont St. Cinnaminson, 
N.J. 08077; B.A. Economics. Jennifer L. Coleman, 
Smith St. East Hampton, Ct. 06424; B.A. Modern 
Languages. Richard L. Colline, 1 407 Deer Path, 
Mountainside, N.J. 07092; B.A. Psychology. 
Marie M. Collins, Lyon Ridge Rd. Katonah, N.Y. 
10536; B.A. Economics. Virginia T. Condon, 36 
Oxen Hill Rd. Trumbull, Ct. 0661 1; B.S. Nursing. 
Linda A. Con/in, 158 Brooklawn Ave. Bridgeport, 
Ct. B.S. Psychology. Anthony A. Coppola, 31 Da- 
lewood Ave. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.S. Mathemat- 
ics. James C. Corcoran, Jr. 535 Daventry Rd. Ber- 
wyn, Pa. 19312; B.A. Economics. Joan L. Costello, 
134 S. Hamilton St. Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 12601; 
B.A. Religious Studies. Kathleen F. Costello, 1 5 
Knickerbocker Ave. Paterson, N.J. 07503; B.S. 
Mathematics. 



102 





Jim Cesiro 



Keith Chamberlin 





Katherine Clarke 



Laurie Clancy 





Bob Checola 



Gabe Cherichello 



Pat Chesser 




Ciggy" Cignoli 






Kim Cloutman 



Pat Colandrea 



Sue Colangelo 



Jennifer Coleman 










Rich Colline 



Mimi Collins 



Ginny Condon 



Linda Conlin 







Tony Coppola 



Jim Corcoran 



Joan Costello 



Kathy Costello 



103 







Kevin Costello 



Sue Cramp 



Ed Cranston 



"Mo" Craven 





Denise D'Addario 




Judd Davis 





Donna Dakun 




Jack DeCarlo 




Mary Dellacamera 



Larry Delia Valla 



104 





"'Jimbo ' Cronin 



Mike Cuddy 





Camille Daly 



Lori Darretta 





Jan Decho 



Eileen DeGregorio 





Rick DeMaio 



Mark Dempsey 



Kevin P. Costello, 161 Ladderback Lane, Devon, 
Pa. 19333, B.A. English. Steven E. Cowe//, 365 
Fairfax Dr. Stratford, Ct. 06497, B.S. Manage- 
ment. Kathleen A. Coyne, 240 S. Highland Rd. 
Springfield, Pa. 19064, B.A. Psychology, Susan E. 
Cramp, 22 Nichols Ave. Shelton, Ct. 06484, 
B.S. Marketing. Edward R. Cranston, 1 04 New- 
town Ave. Stratford, Ct. 06497; B.A. Politics. 
Maureen A. Craven, 17 Roosevelt Ave. Holyoke, 
Ma. 01040, B.A. Psychology. James P. Cronin, 57 
Evergreen St. Waldwick, N.J. 07463, B.S. Ac 
counting. Michael D. Cuddy, 1 35 Downs Ave. 
Stamford, Ct. 06902; B.S. Management. Denise 
A. Daddario, 2212 Huntington Tpke. Trumbull, Ct 
06611; B.S. Biology. Donna M. Dakun, 6 Cam 
pfield Dr. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. History. Cam 
ille R. Daly, 187 Crescent Ave. Wyckoff, N.J 
07481; B.S. Nursing. Lorraine C. Darretta, 113 
Park Ave. Harrison, N.Y. 1 0528; B.A. English. Jus 
tin S. Davis, 32 Holiday Dr. Norwalk, Ct. 06851 
B.A. English. John R. DeCarlo, 496 Jennings Ave 
Bridgeport, Ct. 06610; B.A. Psychology. Janice S 
Decho, 28 Bunting Rd. Seymour, Ct. 06483; B.S 
Nursing. Eileen DeGregorio, 823 Warren Ave 
Thornwood, N.Y. 10594; B.S. Psychology. Mary 
C. Dellacamera, 119 Tarbell Ave. Oakville, Ct 
06779; B.A. Modern Languages. Lawrence Delia 
Valla, 45 Prospect St. Port Chester, N.Y. 10573 
B.A. Economics. Richard A. DeMaio, 120 Candle 
wyck Dr. Newington, Ct. 06111; B.S. Biology 
Marie F. Dempsey, 82 Fremont Ave. Park Ridge 
N.J. 07650; B.A. History. 



105 






Pearse Derrig, 14 Ascolese Rd. Trumbull, Ct. 
0661 1; B.S. Biology. Salvatore A. DeSimone, 459 
Dexter Dr. Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.S. Mathemat- 
ics. Carol A. DeVitto, 1 65 Wilbar Dr. Stratford, 
Ct. 06497; B.A. Sociology. Debra A. Dewyea, 
366 Camp St. Plainville, Ct. 06062; B.S. Market- 
ing. Noreen E. Dickinson, 1 79 Arnold Dr. East 
Hartford, Ct. 06108; B.A. Psychology. Joan M. 
Dillman, 85 Cambridge Ave. Garden City, N.Y. 
11530; B.A. History. Michael V. DiMassa, 739 
Orange Center Rd. Orange, Ct. 06477; B.A. 
English. Joseph E. Dimyan, 96 Elm St. Danbury, 
Ct. 06810; B.A. History. Anthony D. Dippolito, 
5422 Burwood Ave. Pennsuken, N.J. 08109; B.S. 
Biology. John F. Do/an ///, 560 Wolcott Hill, Weth- 
ersfield, Ct. 06109; B.A. Politics. Barbara A. Doll, 
50 Strawberry Hill, Hillsdale, N.J. 07642; B.S. 
Mathematics. Francis Donnarumma, 5 Kaytonne 
Ave. Waterbury, Ct. 06710; B.A. Politics. Arthur 
M. D'Onofrio, 63 Coppermill Rd. Wethersfield, Ct. 
06109; B.A. History. Maryann A. Donovan, 41 
Whitney St. Watertown, Ma. 021 72; B.S. Biology. 
Maryanne Donovan, 42 Grundy Place, Merrick, 
N.Y. 1 1566; B.A. English. Mary Jane Dorrian, 33- 
44 159th St. New York, N.Y. 1 1358. Andrea B. 
D'Ortenzio, 1445 Pembroke St. Bridgeport, Ct. 
06608; B.A. English. Donald J. Drew, 9 Fernwood 
Rd. Livingston, N.J. 07039; B.S. Biology. 



106 





Sal Desimone 



Carol DeVitto 





Tony Dippolito 



Jackie Dolan 





Maryanne Donovan 



Mary Jane Dorrian 





Bonnie D'Ortenzio 



Don Drew 





Debbie Dewyea 



Noreen Dickinson 



Joni Dillman 



Joe Dimyan 







B.D." Doll 



Fran Donnarumma 



Artie D'Onofrio 



Maryann Donovan 




107 






Dee Duffy 



Dave Dziewulski 



"Dewey" Egan 




Kathy Enright 





Pam Esposito 



Sue Evans 





Mary Ehmann 




"Red-Eye" Fabbri 




Bea Farlekas 







Lorraine Farrel 



108 






Marlowe Farrar 



Dennis Farrell 





John Fassl 



Kevin Fauteux 



Deirdre A. Duffy, 38 Hiawatha Lane, Westport, 
Ct. 06880, B.A. Sociology. David M. Dziewulski, 
161 Broadmere Rd. Stratford, Ct. 06497; B.S. Bi- 
ology. Andrew F. Egan, 30 Fairmount Blvd. Gar- 
den City, N.Y. 1 1530; B.S. Psychology. Mary G. 
Ehmann, 45 Vanderbilt Ave. Saint James, N.Y. 
11780; B.S. Nursing. Kathleen M. Enright, 625 
Iroquois St. Oradell, N.J. 07649, B.A. Psychol- 
ogy. James R. Ensign, 24 Tamarack Place, Wilton 
Ct. 06897; B.A. History. Pamela M. Esposito, 
1257 Barnum Ave. Bridgeport Ct. 06610, B.A. 
Modern Language. Paul B. Evans, 74 1 Sport Hill 
Rd. Easton, Ct. 06612; B.A. History. Suzanne M. 
Evans, 28 Bellaire Manor, Cromwell, Ct. 064 1 6; 
B.S. Chemistry. Sharman B. Everett, 33 Kirkham 
Place, Stamford, Ct. B.A. Philosophy. Eugene J. 
Fabbri, PO Box 14 Karl St. Litchfield, Ct. 06759, 
B.S. Marketing. Peter J. Fallon, Ballast Lane, 
Marblehead, Ma. 01945; B.A. Politics. Beatrice E. 
Farlekas, 42 Riverside Dr. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; 
B.A. Politics. Mar/owe G. Farrar, 85 Locust St. 
Milford, Ct. 06460; B.A. Politics. Dennis M. Far- 
rell, 4013 Amon Ave. Pennsauken. N.J. 08110; 
B.A. Psychology. Lorraine Farrell, 63 New Mill Rd. 
Smithtown, N.Y. 11787; B.S. Biology. John 7. 
Fassl, 512 Eighth Ave. New Hyde Park, N.Y. 
1 1040; B.S. Accounting. Kevin T. Fauteux, 73 Sa- 
lem Rd. East Hartford, Ct. 061 18; B.A. Theology. 



109 



Christine E. Feeney, 1 80 Colonial Ave. Albany, 
N.Y. 12208. Kathryn M. Fenton, 4758 Madison 
Ave. Trumbull, Ct. 0661 1; B.A. History. Gene N. 
Feola, 39 Fairview Ave. Trumbull, Ct. 0661 1; B.S. 
Management. Suzanne E. Ferencz, 2 Hull Street 
Ansonia, Ct. 06401; B.A. History. Alexander Fer- 
meglia, 145-61 6th Ave. Whitestone, N.Y. 
11357; B.A. English. Richard E. Fernandez, 28 
First Ave. Gloversville, N.Y. 1 2078; B.S. Biology. 
Thomas R. Ferrara, 75 Hawthorne Ave. Derby, Ct. 
06418; B.S. Accounting. Charles A. Ferraro, 9 
Walnut Ave. Cambridge, Ma. 02140; B.A. Eco- 
nomics. Richard A. Ferrieri, 4 Birchwood Lane, 
Peekskill, N.Y. 10566; B.S. Chemistry. Daniel J. 
Fitzgerald, 460 Hilltop Rd. Paoli, Pa. 19301; B.S. 
Biology. Brian J. Fitzsimons, 96 Lakewood Ave. Ho 
Ho Kus, NJ. 07423; B.A. Sociology. Robin H. 
Fletcher, 135 Sibbald Drive, Park Ridge, N.Y. 
07656; B.A. English. She/7a M. Flynn, 1 54 Stoney 
Lea Rd. Dedham, Ma. 02026; B.S. Nursing. Eu- 
gene W. Foley, 1 2 Stuyvesant Oval, New York, 
N.Y. 10009; B.S. Management. Terrence J. Foran, 
55 Carroll Rd. E. Hartford, Ct. 06108; B.A. Poli- 
tics. Christopher Fountas, 42 Hillside Ave. Milford, 
Ct. 06460; B.S. Marketing. Christine T. Fowler, 
210 Pondview Dr. Chicopee, Ma. 01020; B.A. 
Politics. Michael P. Fox, 167 Norma Rd. Teaneck, 
NJ. 07666; B.A. Religious Studies. Susan J. Fra- 
her, 414 Hayden Hill, Torrington, Ct. 06790; B.A. 
Economics. Eileen D. Frankel, 82 S. Main St. So. 
Norwalk, Ct. 06854; B.A. Modern Languages. Da- 
vid J. Frascarelli, P.O. Box 1041, Litchfield, Ct. 
06759; B.A. Politics. 



110 





Chris Feeney 



Kathy Fenton 






Chris Fowler 







\ ^ 




_ 




/ 








1 


i ]W? 






Gene Feola 



Sue Ferencz 



Al Fermeglia 



"T" Ferrara 





Chuck Ferraro 





Rich Ferrieri 




Dan Fitzgerald 




Robin Fletcher 



Sheila Flynn 



Gene Foley 







Mike Fox 



Sue Fraher 



Eileen Frankel 



, , # » • 

* • » • • . . 

Dave Frascarelli 



1 1 






1 



Lois Fusco 



Margie Gallagher 



1 

Mark Gallagher 




Kevin Galvin 




Debbie Garner 





Debbie Garrity 





Bill Garvey 



Karen Geary 











■ 







Paul Giangarra 



Bob Giannini 



Barbara Gibson 



Claire Gillen 



112 





Neil Galvin 



"Bear" Garceau 







« 



Keith Garvey 





Donna George 





Annie Gillis 



Lynn Girard 



Lois A. Fusco, 1 8 Catherine Ave. Waterbury, Ct. 
06704; B.A. English. Margaret L. Gallagher, 76 
Sumner St. Auburn, Ma. 01501; B.S. Nursing. 
Mark J. Gallagher, 94 Plymouth St. Stratford, Ct. 
06497; B.S. Finance. Kevin R. Galvin, 324 W. 
Fourth Ave. Roselle, N.J. 07203; B.S. Biology. 
Neil P. Galvin, 75 Bedlow Ave. Newport, R.I. 
02840; B.A. Economics. Roger J. Garceau, 55 
Plymouth St. Middleboro, Ma. 02346, B.S. Biol- 
ogy. Deborah C. Garner, 21 1G West 151 St. 
New York, N.Y. 10039; B.A. Politics. Deborah A. 
Garrity, 132 Clairmont Dr. Woodcliff Lake, N.J. 
07675; B.S. Nursing. Keith J. Garvey, 67 Knolls 
Dr. No. New Hyde Park, N.Y. 1 1040; B.A. Eco- 
nomics. William J. Garvey, 715 Highland Ave. 
Clarks Green, Pa. 1841 1; B.A. Politics. Karen E. 
Geary, 27 Douglas Rd. Glen Ridge, N.J. 07028; 
B.A. Modern Languages. Andrea N. Genuario, 
130 East Rocks Rd. Norwalk, Ct. 06851. Donna 
M. George, 952 Armory St. Springfield, Ma. 
01 107; B.A. English. Paul P. Giangarra, 248 Ka- 
ren Dr. Orange, Ct. 06477; B.S. Mathematics. 
Robert P. Giannini, 145 Beardsley Park Terrace, 
Bridgeport, Ct. 06610; B.S. Biology. Barbara T. 
Gibson, 429 School St. Athol, Ma. 01331; B.S. 
Biology. Clare E. Gillen, 318 Linwood Ave. Ridge- 
wood, N.J. 07450; B.A. Modern Languages. Anne 
Mary Gillis, 76 Elmerston Rd. Rochester, N.Y. 
14620; B.S. Nursing. Thomas W. Gilman, 332 La- 
keview Ave. E. Brightwaters, N.Y. 11718; B.S. Ac- 
counting. Lynn M. Girard, 1 7 Brent Rd. Manches- 
ter, Ct. 06040; B.S. Nursing. 



13 



Joseph M. Glotzbier, 61 Spring St. Tarrytown, 
N.Y. 10591; B.A. Economics. Nancy M. Golem- 
beski, 10 Red Root Lane, Milford, Ct. 06460; B.S. 
Chemistry. Anne C. Graham, 70 Fremont St. 
Bridgeport, Ct. B.A. Psychology. Gary S. Grant, 
36 Cottage Lane, Concord, Ma. 01 742; B.S. Phys- 
ics. Patricia Greco, 30 Dwarskill Lane, Norwood, 
N.J. 07648; B.A. English. Mary Joan M. 
Greeley, 232 Burt Rd. Springfield, Ma. 01118; 
B.A. Psychology. John T. Griffin, RFD. 4 Wood St. 
Mahopac, N.Y. 10541; B.S. Biology. Anita J. 
Grosso, 4605 Madison Ave. Trumbull, Ct. 0661 1; 
B.A. Psychology. Deborah R. Grunwald, 91 Jones 
Dr. New Britain, Ct. 06053; B.S. Mathematics. 
Carolyn Guarascio, 4 Kotfield Court, Melville, 
N.Y. 1 1 746; B.A. English. Michael W. Guden, 8 
Beachcroft Lane, Trumbull, Ct. 06611; B.S. Fi- 
nance. Nadine Guerriero, 1 1 Anpell Dr. Scars- 
dale, N.Y. 10583; B.A. English. Amy S. Guest, 
127 Main Entrance, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15228; B.A. 
Psychology. Gregory R. Guydish, 2031 Girard 
Ave. West Lawn, Pa. 19609; B.A. Philosophy. 
Elizabeth A. Hanlon, 463 Carpenter Place, Union, 
N.J. 07083; B.A. English. Martha Jo Hanlon, 66 
Fairmount Blvd. Garden City, N.Y. 11530; B.S. 
Nursing. John H. Hannigan, 660 Reef Rd. Fair- 
field, Conn. 06430; B.S. Psychology. Wi7//'am E. 
Hapworth, 161 Washington Ave. West Caldwell, 
N.J. 07006; B.S. Biology. Sean M. Harrigan, 1 3 
Eldorado Rd. Chelmsford, Ma. 01824; B.A. His- 
tory. James M. Harriss, 274 Inwood Rd. Bridge- 
port, Ct. 06604; B.S. Accounting. 



114 





Joe Glotzbier 



Nancy Golembeski 





John Griffen 



Anita Grosso 





Mike Guden 



Nadine Guerriero 





Beth Hanlon 



Martha Hanlon 





Anne Graham 



Gary Grant 





Mary Jo Greeley 





Debbie Grunwald 




Amy Guest 





Carolyn Guarascio 




Gregg Guydish 




'Dr. Buzzo" Hapworth 



Sean Harrigan 



115 





Bonnie Healy 





Bill Hendricks 




Dave Heywood 



Charlie Hills 







Kevin Hinchey 



Kathy Hofmann 



Paul Hollenstein 



Russ Holt 







Deb Homick 



Doc" Hynes 



Jeff lanoco 



Liz Ince 



116 





Liz Henning 



Jose Hernandez 






Nancy Intagliatto 



'Jay" Jaeger 



Bonnie A. Healy, 1 1 3 Vineyard Rd. Hamden, Ct. 
06517; B.A. English. Patricia A. Hemphill, 601 
Baltzell Ave. Fort Benning, Ga. 31905, B.A. Soci- 
ology. William J. Hendricks, 25 Fox St. Fairfield, 
Ct. 06430, B.S. Chemistry. Elizabeth E. Henning, 
45 Mason Dr. Manhasset, N.Y. 1 1030, B.A. Reli- 
gious Studies. Jose H. Hernandez, Box 859 Fair- 
field University, Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. Sociol- 
ogy. David A. Heywood, 4 Charmaine Dr. 
Rochester, N.Y. 14624; B.A. Modern Languages. 
Charles F. Hills, 3052 Burr St. Fairfield, Ct. 
06430; B.A. History. Kevin T. Hinchey, 160 Chest- 
nut Hill, Glastonbury, Ct. 06033, B.A. English. 
Katherine M. Hofmann, 183 Spruce St. Roslyn 
Harbor, N.Y. 1 1576, B.A. English. Paul J. Hollens- 
tein, 674 Westview Court, River Edge, N.J. 
07661, B.A. Psychology. Russell K. Holt, 25 Brady 
Loop. Andover, tv\a. 01810; B.S. Management. 
Deborah H. Homick, 81 Snow Apple Lane, Milford, 
Ct. 06460; B.A. Politics. Dorothy L. Hooper, 45 
Pembroke Rd. Darien, Ct. 06820; B.A. History. 
Kathleen M. Houlihan, 21 Surrey Dr. North Mer- 
rick, N.Y. 1 1566; B.S. Nursing. Robert F. Hynes, 
23 Dellview Dr. Edison, N.J. 08817; B.A. Politics. 
Godfrey A. lacono, 94 Clinton St. Malverne, N.Y. 
1 1565; B.S. Accounting. Elizabeth Ince, 13 Burn- 
ham Place, Fairlawn, N.J. B.A. Modern Languages. 
Nancy A. Intagliatto, 141 Forestview Rd. Bridge- 
port, Ct. 06606; B.S. Chemistry. John H. Ireland, 
19 Devonshire Rd. West Norwalk, Ct. 06850; 
B.A. History. Joseph J. Jaeger, 90 Sunrise Terrace, 
Staten Island, N.Y. 10304; B.S. Management. 



1 17 



Theresa A. Jancar, 1 1 1 Middlebrook Dr. Fair- 
field, Ct. 06430; B.S. Management. Mark 
W. Jenusaitis, Watertown Rd. Middlebury, Ct. 
06762; B.S. Mathematics. Daryl W. Johnson, 
81 A Karen Ct. Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.A. 
Politics. Paul C. Johnson, 510 Barlow Rd. 
Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.S. Finance. Regina C. 
Johnson, 190-01 Dormans Rd. St. Albans, 
N.Y. 11412; B.A. Psychology. David P. 
Jones, 19 Thompson Place, Lynbrook, N.Y. 
11563; B.S. Accounting. Patricia M. Joyce, 
12 Robert St. Old Bethpage, N.Y. 11804; 
B.S. Biology. Kenneth S. Kasloski, 222 Wells 
St. Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.A. Modern Lan- 
guages. Dianne J. Kasper, 89 Weber Ave. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 06610; B.A. Modern Lan- 
guages. Paul S. Kawulicz,4 Cold Spring Dr. 
New Fairfield, Ct. 06810; B.S. Biology. 
James T. Keefe, 107 Holyrood Ave. Lowell, 
Ma. 01852; B.A. Economics. Joan W. Kee- 
nan, 91 Harwvard Ave. Rockville Centre, 
N.Y. 11570; B.A. English. Nancy A. Kekac, 
1708 Boston Ave. Bridgeport, Ct. 06610; 
B.A. Politics. Juliann T. Kelemen, 1 07 Mat- 
thew Dr. Stratford, Ct. 06497; B.S. Math- 
ematics. Linda T. Kelemen, 320 Ronald Dr. 
Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.S. Accounting. Kevin 
J. Kelleher, 47 Holbrook St. Ansonia, Ct. 
06401. Patricia E. Kelley, 318 Littleworth 
Lane, Sea Cliff, N.Y. 11579; B.A. Politics. 
Mary Kelly, 1 35 Knollwood Dr. Fairfield, Ct. 
06430; B.S. Management. Raymond J. Kelly, 
19 Monmouth Rd. Oceanport, N.J. 07757; 
B.A. History. 




Theresa Jancar 




Paul Johnson 



118 





Pat Joyce 



Ken Kasloski 





Jimmy Keefe 



Joan Keenan 






Regina Johnson 




Jonesy" Jones 




Dianne Kasper 



Paul Kawulicz 





Nancy Kekac 



Juliann Kelemen 





"Kel" Kelemen 



Kevin Kelleher 





'Kelso" Kelley 





Ray Kelly 



119 






If 



Joan Kenney 



Larry Kiely 



Julie King 



f 



"Rorie" Klaus 



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tg 


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Terry Kowalski 



Ted Kowar 



Carol Krous 



Steve Krupa 




120 





Tom Klonoski 



Joan Knox 




. ~ • . • • * IK . *. » » * ...<> 



Bill Kuhn 



Darien Laboy 





Mike Lapsia 



Mary Lavin 





Mike Lazzara 



John Leach 



Joan M. Kenney, 1 20 1 Media Rd. Cherry Hill, N.J. 
08034; B.A. Psychology. Lawrence T. Kiely, 1 1 
Sherman Bridge, Wayland, Ma. 01778; B.S. 
Mathematics. Julie Ann King, 407 Beach Ave. Ma- 
maroneck, N.Y. 10543; B.S. Nursing. Rosemarie 
Klaus, 62-26 80 Ave. Glendale, N.Y. 11227; 
B.A. Modern Languages. Hiomas E. Klonoski, 106 
Bristol St. Waterbury, Ct. 06708, B.A. Philosophy. 
Joan M. Knox, 58 Commander Ave. Garden City, 
N.Y. 11530; B.A. Politics. Victoria A. Koguf, 44 
Dogwood Lane, Fairfield, Ct. 06430, B.A. English. 
Teresa V. Kowalski, 515 Roselle St. Linden, N.J. 
07036; B.S. Accounting. Theodore A. Kowar, 1 73 
Knollwood Rd. Newington, Ct. 06 1 1 1 ; B.A. His- 
tory. Carol M. Krous, 18 Carey St. Newport, R.I. 
02840; B.A. Modern Languages. Steven W. 
Krupa, 62 Brownell Ave. Hartford, Ct. 06106, 
B.S. Mathematics. William J. Kuhn, 101 Harriet 
Rd. North Babylon, N.Y. 11703; B.S. Biology. 
Kenneth VV. Kwochka, 52 Roosevelt Dr. Ansonia, 
Ct. 06401; B.S. Biology. Darien Laboy, 128 East 
Main St. Bridgeport, Ct. 06608; B.S. Manage- 
ment. Dennis M. Laccavole, 46 Spring St. Strat- 
ford, Ct. 06497; B.S. Management. Richard VV. 
Lambert, 60 Hurd Ave. Monroe, Ct. 06468, B.A. 
Psychology. Michael F. Laspia, 5 1 Meadow Way, 
East Hampton, N.Y. 11937; B.S. Biology. Mary 
M. Lavin, 31312 Fairwin Dr. Bay Village, Oh. 
44140; B.S. Marketing. Michael G. Lazzara, 49 
Woolsley Ave. Trumbull, Ct. 06611; B.S. Chem- 
istry. Jonathan S. Leach, 52 Old Tappan Rd. Glen 
Cove, N.Y. 11542; B.S. Marketing. 



121 



Lorraine M. Lecesne, 67 Henry St. Hasbrouck 
Heights, N.J. 07604; B.A. English. Susan M. Lecl- 
erc, 1590 Fairfield Ave. Bridgeport, Ct. 06605; 
B.S. Biology. Patricia A. Lee, 501 Malcolm Rd. 
Union, N.J. 07083; B.A. Psychology. Susan H. 
Leiss, 280 Brookbend Rd. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; 
B.S. Nursing. Michele A. Leparulo, 1 05 New 
England Ave. Summit, N.J. 07901; B.S. Chem- 
istry. Richard R. Leventhal, 46 Yorktown Circle, 
Trumbull, Ct. 0661 1; B.S. Biology. Joseph A. Lin- 
nehan, 54 Parkview Ave. Lowell, Ma. 01 852; B.A. 
Politics. Diane Logan, 301 South Chestnut, West- 
wood, N.J. 07675; B.A. Psychology. Robert S. Lo- 
gan, 84 Nonopoge Rd. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. 
Fine Arts. Gary T. Long, 2425 Norton St. Roches- 
ter, N.Y. 14609; B.S. Biology. Laszlo J. 
Lorincz, 77 Mile Common Rd 1 , Fairfield, Ct. 
06430; B.S. Biology. Linda D. Loucony, 3125 Old 
Town Rd. Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.A. Psychology. 
Russell G. Lowry, Plumtrees Rd. Bethel, Ct. 06801; 
B.S. Marketing. Joseph M. Loya, 26 Sunset Hill, 
Bethel, Ct. 06801; B.A. English. Richard J. Luci- 
bella, 384 Manley Hgts Rd. Orange, Ct. 06477; 
B.S. Biology. Deborah Mabry, 57H Eastern Circle, 
New Haven, Ct. 06513; B.S. Management. Lynn 
A. Madigan, 55 Whitney Ave. Trumbull, Ct. 
0661 1; B.A. English. Elisa M. Maher, 90 Stuyve- 
sant Ave. Larchmont, N.Y. 10538; B.S. Nursing. 



122 





Lorraine Lecesne 



Sue Leiss 





Joe Linnehan 



Diane Logan 





Michele LeDarulo 






Rich Leventhal 




Gary Long 





Laszlo Lorincz 



Linda Loucony 










Russ Lowry 



Rich Lucibella 



Debbie Mabry 



Lisa Maher 



123 




Debbie Mahoney 






Peggy Mahoney 



Helen Malinka 



Bill Malloy 




Lisa Mannetti 




-/ 

\ 



Jeff Martin 





Arlene Mara 




Joan Martin 







Bill McBain 



Mary Lou McCall 



Jim McCarthy 



"Goober" McCormack 



124 




Mary Ellen Mangan 



Linda Mangiafico 





Margaret Marks 



"Pepper" Martin 




Deborah L. Mahoney, 2 Cromwell Court North, 
Old Saybrook, Ct. 06475; B.A. Psychology. Mar- 
guerite A. Mahoney, 40 Chalfonte Dr. Springfield, 
Ma. Oil 18, B.A. English. Helen M. Malinka, 16 
Florence Rd. Harrington Park, N.J. 07640, B.A. 
Fine Arts. William H. Malloy, 3915 Wheat Court, 
Alexandria, Va. 2231 1; B.A. English. Maryellen L. 
Mangan, 35-17 149th Place, Flushing, N.Y. 
11354; B.A. History. Linda S. Mangiafico, 111 
Goff Brook Circle, Wethersfield, Ct. 06109, B.A. 
Modern Languages. Thomas A. Mangines, 149 
Fourth Ave. Milford, Ct. 06460; B.A. History. Lisa 
A. Mannetti, 12 Austin Place, Port Chester, N.Y. 
10573; B.A. English. Arlene B. Mara, 120 Frank- 
lin St. Cedar Grove, N.J. 07009; B.A. Psychology. 
Margaret A. Marks, 52 Cavan Rd. East Hartford, 
Ct. 06118; B.S. Nursing. Robert Marlow, 166-B 
Cayuga Lane, Stratford, Ct. 06497; B.A. English. 
James M. Martin, 92 Miller St. Springfield, Ma. 
01104; B.A. Economics. Jeffrey J. Martin, 92 
Centerport Rd. Centerport, N.Y. 1 1721; B.A. Phi- 
losophy; Joan A. Martin, 95 Birch St. Stratford, 
Ct. 06497; B.A. Psychology. William H. McBain, 
Jr., 1620 North View Dr. Miami Beach, Fl. 
33140; B.S. Finance. Mary Lou McCall, 376 Lake- 
view Dr. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. English. James 
J. McCarthy, 131 Treaty Rd. Drexel Hill, Pa. 
19026; B.A. English. Mary A. McCormack, 1 10 
North 1 1th St. New Hyde Park, N.Y. 1 1040; B.A. 
History. 



125 



Peter R. McCormack, 55 Scribner Ave. South Nor- 
walk, Ct. 06854; B.A. Psychology. Eileen C. 
McDermott, 36 Oakwood Ave. Glen Ridge, N.J. 
07028; B.A. English. Anthony M. McDonald, 
1502 Round Hill Road, Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. 
English. William P. McDonald, 65 Far Mill Drive, 
Stratford, Ct. 06497; B.A. English. Barbara A. 
McGill, 1013 Mary Lane, Rotterdam, N.Y. 12303; 
B.S. Biology. Christine McGuire, 30 Chase Ave. 
Dennisport, Ma. 02632; B.A. Sociology. Ellen J. 
McGuire, 1 9 Valley View Road, Newtown, Ct. 
06470; B.A. English. Margaret T. McKenna, 85 
Girard Ave. West Malverne, N.Y. 11565; B.A. 
Politics. Sarah A. McKeon, 75 Wepawaug Road, 
Woodbridge, Ct. 06525. C//nton R. McLean, 271 
Ann St. Meriden, Ct. 06450; B.A. Biology. Celeste 
P. McMullin, 2 Sage Hill Lane, Albany, N.Y. 
12204; B.A. Psychology. James V. Medici, 7 A 
Maple Ave. Barrington, R.I. 02806; B.A. Politics. 
Patricia M. Melone, 54 Bemis Road, Weston, Ma. 
02193; B.S. Nursing. Ronald M. Meneo, 200 
Howard Dr. Hamden, Ct. 06514; B.A. Politics. 
Linda A. Merole, 8 Victory St. Stamford, Ct. 
06902; B.A. Modern Languages. Robert J. Miano, 
137 Crest St. Wethersfield, Ct. 06109. Kathleen 
P. Miniter, 1 8 Richmond St. East Haven, Ct. 
0651 2; B.S. Nursing. Anthony G. Mixcus, 6 Victo- 
ria St. Torrington, Ct. 06790; B.A. Economics. An- 
drea M. Monaco, 86 Presidents Lane, Quincy, Ma. 
02169; B.S. Nursing. 



126 






Peggy McKenna 



Sarah McKeon 





Ron Meneo 



Linda Merole 



^ > 






Tony McDonald 



Bill McDonald 






Barbara McG 



Chris McGuire 



Ellen McGuire 







Clint McLean 



"Zelmo" McMullin 



Jim Medici 



Patty Melone 




Bobby Miano 






Tony Mixcus 



Andrea Monaco 



127 





Serena Moore 




Joe Morina 




Jean Mortimer 




Pete Morton 





John Mullins 



Marilyn Murphy 




128 





Tom Moore 



"Jungle Jim" Moron 





Bruce Morlino 



Kathy Morrissey 





Paul Moyse 



Alice Mulligan 




Pat Myslewski 



Mary Neaf 



Serena Moore, 180 Canal St. Apt. 54, New 
Haven, Ct. 06511, B.A. Sociology. Thomas F 
Moore, 328 Barr Ave. Teaneck, N.J. 07666, B.A 
English. James S. Moron, Maplewood Lane, North 
ford, Ct. 06472, B.A. History. Maiy K. Moran 
1558 Capitol Ave. Bridgeport, Ct. 06604. B.A 
English. Joseph J. Morina, Hillside Ave. Haver 
straw, N.Y. 10927, B.A. Sociology. Bruce Mor 
lino, 7 Tower Hill Dr. Port Chester, N.Y. 10573 
B.S. Marketing. Kathleen M. Morrissey, 37 Brook 
St. Newington, Ct. 06111, B.A. History. Jean 
marie D. Mortimer, 237 Puritan Road, West Palm 
Beach, Fl. 33405; B.S. Biology. Peter J. Morton, 
82 Spring Hill Ave. Norwalk, Ct. 06850, B.A. His- 
tory. Paul Anthony Moyse, 73 Concord Ave. Glen 
Rock, N.J. 07452; B.S. Biology. Alice E. Mulligan, 
364 Graydon Terr. Ridgewood, N.J. 07450; B.A. 
Fine Arts. John Mullins, 1 82 Bunnell St. Bridgeport, 
Ct. 06607; B.A. Philosophy. Marilyn Murphy, 404 
Wolcott Hill Road, Wethersfield, Ct. 06109; B.A. 
Sociology. Patricia A. Myslewski, 121 Dogwood 
Dr. Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.S. Mathematics. 
Mary K. Neaf, 114 George Ave. Edison, N.J. 
08817; B.A. English. 



129 



Michael A. Nealon, 233 Dexter Dr. Bridge- 
port, Ct. 06606; B.A. History. Ellen R. Nelson 
11 Clancy Dr. Northport Bay, N.J. 11768. 
Kenneth M. Newman, 221 New Hyde Park, 
Garden City, N.Y. 1 1530; B.A. History. Ron- 
ald A. Niedzwiecki, 28 McNeil Terr. Strat- 
ford, Ct. 06497; B.S. Management. Susan A. 
Nuovo, Taylor Road, Huntington Bay, N.Y. 
1 1 743; B.A. English. Peter J. Nuzzi, 6 Olive 
St. Lake Success, N.Y. 11020. Diane M. 
Oakley, 174 Columbus Road, Demarest, N.J. 
07627; B.S. Mathematics. Denise C. O'Brien, 
2061 27th St. Astoria, N.Y. 11105; B.A. 
Psychology. Grael M. O'Brien, 152 Benedict 
Ave. Fairfield, Ct. 06604; B.A. Fine Arts. 
John J. O'Connor, 227 Paul Ct. Hillsdale, 
N.J. 07642; B.A. Politics. Maureen E. 
O'Connor, 8 Shoredale Dr. Manhasset, N.Y. 
11030; B.S. Nursing. Patricia J. O'Connor, 
22 Circle Dr. Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 11577; 
B.A. History. Thomas B. O'Connor, 18 Gar- 
net Terr. Livingston, N.J. 07039; B.S. Man- 
agement. John P. O'Donnell, 181 Henderson 
Road, Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. Sociology. 
Eileen S. O'Donoghue, 71 Lincoln Ave. Ruth- 
erford, N.J. 07070; B.A. Sociology. James 
V. O'Gara, 75 Bedell Ave. Hempstead, N.Y. 
11550; B.A. History. Theodore A. Okon, 16 
Center Dr. Malba, N.Y. 1 1357; B.S. Biology. 
Sheila A. O'Loughlin, 60 Locust Lane, Need- 
ham, Ma. 02192; B.S. Nursing. 



130 





Ellen Nelson 



Kenny Newman 





Ron Niedzwiecki 



Sue Nuovo 





Peter Nuzzi 



Dianne Oakley 




'r*$$ f A%M 

"Oakie" O'Connor 




John O'Donnell 








Denise O'Brien 



'Oakie" O'Connor 



Margaret O'Connor 



Pat O'Connor 




Eileen O Donoghue 




Jim O'Gara 




Ted Okon 




Shelia O'Loughlin 
131 




Janet Olsen 





Ed Palumbo 





Joyce Olszewski 




Steve Packard 







^mmm 



John Panzarino 







Vito Patrissi 



Kathy Pavlick 



Dom Peilizzari 



Donna Peretti 



132 




Tim O Mara 



'Bobby O" O'Neil 




Donna Packo 



Diane Paczynski 





Honest - ' Jon Pascale 



Joan Paterson 





Fred Perlak 



Marylou Peterson 



Janet M. Olsen, 601 Stellman Dr. River Vale, 
N.J. 07675, B.S. Marketing. Joyce A. Ol- 
szewski, 325 Daniels Farm Road, Trumbull, 
Ct. 0661 1; B.A. Modern Languages. Timothy 
J. OMara, 58 Union St. Montclair, N.J. 
07042; B.S. Chemistry. Robert T. O'Neill, 
2525 Nostrand Ave. Brooklyn, NY. 11210; 
B.A. Psychology. Francis M. Osak, 7 Windy 
Acres Road, Shelton, Ct. 06484, B.S. Biol 
ogy. Stephen M. Packard, 99 Plymouth Lane, 
Manchester, Ct. 06040; B.S. Biology. Donna 
M. Packo, 1130 Park Ave. Bridgeport, Ct. 
06604; B.S. Nursing. Diane J. Paczynski, 
1540 Long Meadow, Mountainside, N.J. 
07092, B.S. Mathematics. Francis Palestrini, 
4799 Colostream Dr. Doraville, Ga. 30340, 
B.S. Marketing. Edmund L. Palumbo, 23 Vir- 
ginia Road, East Haven, Ct. 06512; B.A. 
English. John P. Panzarino, 35 Chatfield 
Road, Bronxville, N.Y. 10708; B.A. Politics. 
Jon S. Pascale, 1 1 Park Ave. Congers, N.Y. 
10920; B.A. Politics. Joan E. Paterson, 32 
Stone Fence Rd. Allendale, N.J. 07401; B.A. 
English. Vito A. Patrissi, Jr. 100 Cld. Springs 
Rd. Rocky Hill, Ct. 06067; B.S. Finance. 
Kathleen A Pavlick, RFD. 1, Fairfield, Ct. 
06430; B.A. Psychology. Dominick Pellizzari, 
19 Plank La. Glastonbury, Ct. 06033; B.A. 
History. Donna M. Peretti, 6 Cold Spring Cir. 
Shelton, Ct. 06484; B.S. Biology. Frederick J. 
Perlak, 230 Prospect St. Ludlow, Ma. 
01056; B.S. Biology. Marylou Peterson, 125 
Victory St. Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.A. Mod- 
ern Languages. 



133 



Stephen J. Peterson, RR. 3 Underhill Ave. Yorks- 
town Heights, N.Y. 10598; B.S. Biology. Joseph J. 
Pefro, 60 Dover St. Bridgeport, Ct. 06610; B.S. 
Management. David J. Pettinicchi, 221 Purdy Rd. 
Waterbury, Ct. 06706; B.A. History. Stephen R. 
Pettit, 96 Blue Spruce La. Weston, Ct. 06880; 
B.S. Finance. Nancy M. Phalen, 133 Hoffman St. 
Torrington, Ct. 06790; B.A. Modern Languages. 
Lawrence M. Pierce, 14 Wilshire Dr. Syosset, N.Y. 
1 1791; B.A. English. Thomas P. Pilch, 307 Dwight 
St. Waterbury, Ct. 06714; B.A. Modern Lan- 
guages. Charles V. Pirrello, 790 Garfield Ave. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.S. Accounting. Donald 
A. Plude, 636 Burnsford Ave. Bridgeport, Ct. 
06606; B.S. Mathematics. Mary E. Pontone, 335 
Main St. Ridgefield Park, N.J. 07660; B.A. His- 
tory. David F. Porter, 1 77 Bonair Ave. New Roch- 
elle, N.Y. 10804; B.S. Biology. Mary L. Powers, 
1 1 Pine Dr. Woodbury, N.Y. 1 1 797; B.A. Psychol- 
ogy. David C. Prout, 21 Cornell Rd. Cranford, N.J. 
07016. Phyllis A. Pruzinsky, 200 Crest View Dr. 
Bridgeport, Ct.; B.S. Mathematics. Richard A. 
Pych, 55 Chapin Ave. Rocky Hill, Ct. 06067; B.S. 
Accounting. Michael D. Quintan, 3327 160th St. 
Flushing, N.Y. 11358; B.A. English. Robert W. 
Quinlan, 205 Oak Lane, Cranford, N.J. 07016; 
B.S. Marketing. John A. Qu/'nn, 1 6 Cloverdale 
Ave. Staten Island, N.Y. 10308; B.A. Psychology. 
Victor E. Raimo, 214 Ballantine Pwy. Newark, N.J. 
07104; B.A. Psychology. E/7een M. Reale, 23 Tim- 
ber La. Newington, St. 061 1 1; B.S. Biology. Mi- 
chael F. Redden, 6 Rex St. Byram, Ct. 10573; 
B.A. Economics. 



134 





Steve Peterson 



Joe Petro 




Chuck Pirrello 





I 



Mary Lynn Powers 



mMmMKBmm 




ESI ss.- : '$/'// u&wHISmE'A 

Rich Pych 




Mike Quinlan 







Neech" Peftinicchi 



Steve Pettit 



Nancy Phalen 



Tom Pilch 






Don Plude 



"Buffy" Pontone 





Dave Prout 



Phyllis Pruzinsky 




John Qumn 





I 




Vic Raimo 



Eileen Reale 



Mike Redden 



135 




Paul Regan 





John Regnery 




Bill Reveille 



Nikki Richer 




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Charlie Roche 






Turtle" Roland 



Tony Romano 



Lee Roohan 







Gary Roscoe 



Don Ross 



Phyllis Rotella 



Kevin Russell 



136 




Ralph Rehn 



Paula Rencsko 








Mel Riley 



Robo" Robinson 




Paul D. Regan, 38 Lawrence Ave. Avon, Ct. 
06001; B.S. Biology. John R. Regnery, 6 Ware- 
ham Rd. Trumbull, Ct. 0661 I; B.S. Finance. Ralph 
A. Rehn,l 193 Hicks Place, Baldwin, NY. 11510; 
B.S. Finance. Charles F. Reiss, Fairfield University 
Box 1626, Fairfield, Ct. 06430, B.A. Psychology. 
Paula A. Rencsko, 1 5 May St. Ansonia, Ct. 
06401, B.S. Nursing. William C. Revei7/e, 12400 
Frost Court, Potomac, Md.; B.A. Politics. Marilyn F. 
Rice, 6 Marne Ave. Fairfield, Ct. 06430, B.S. Biol- 
ogy. Nikki L. Richer, 6 Blueberry Hill, Hyannis, Ma. 
02601; B.A. Psychology. Melville T. Riley, 99 
Highview Ave. Stamford, Ct. 06907; B.A. History. 
Michael T. Robinson, 1 36 Whitney Ave. Pompton 
Lakes, N.J. 07442; B.S. Management. Charles F. 
Roche, 115 Roanoke Ave. Fairfield, Ct. 06430, 
B.S. Management. Thomas F. Roland, 4007 Ave. 
K, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11210; B.A. Psychology. An 
thony G. Romano, 14 Camore St. Stamford, Ct. 
06905; B.A Psychology. Anthony G. Romano, 14 
Camore St. Stamford, Ct 06905; B.A. Psychology. 
Leo W. Roohan ///, 24 Fifth Ave. Saratoga Springs, 
N.Y. 12866; B.A. History. Gary D. Roscoe, 63 
Leonard Place, Trumbull, Ct. 0661 1; B.A. English. 
Rachael Z. Rose, 36 Hathaway Dr. Garden City, 
N.Y. 11530; B.A. Psychology. Donald J. Ross, 
473 Wormwood Rd. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. 
Classics. Pfiy///'s R. Rotella, 21 Warren St. Water- 
bury, Ct. 06706; B.S. Nursing. Kevin E. Russell, 
107 Lanceway Dr. Mauldin, S.C. 29662; B.A. 
English. 



137 



Nicholas F. Russo, 1 99 Groton Place, West Hemp- 
stead, N.Y. 11552; B.A. History. John W. Rut- 
ledge, 388 Birch St. Teaneck, N.J. 07666; B.S. 
Marketing. Joan M. Ryan, 5508 Jordon Rd. Wash- 
ington, D.C. 20016; B.A. Philosophy. Michael D. 
Ryan, 367 Ocean Drive West, Stamford, Ct. 
06902; B.A. Classics. Richard G. Ryan, 50 Merton 
Ave. Lynbrook, N.Y. 1 1563; B.A. Politics. John A. 
Sakson, 1614 Makefield Rd. Yardley, Pa. 19067; 
B.A. History. Robert J. Saloomey, 71 Hitching Post 
Lane, Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.S. Accounting. Ron- 
ald Saname, 372-B Piute Lane, Stratford, Ct. 
06497. Mario M. Sangillo, 26 Wagon Lane, 
Cherry Hill, N.J. 08034; B.S. Biology. Donald 
Santostefano, Ballfall Rd. Middletown, Ct. 06457; 
B.S. Biology. Wi7//'am B. Sarr, 282 Fern St. West 
Hartford, Ct. 06119; B.A. English. Michael J. 
Schaetzle, 567 Green Valley Rd. Paramus, N.J. 
07652; B.S. Management. Charles D. Schieck, 56- 
19 206th St. Bayside, N.Y. 1 1364; B.S. Finance. 
Donna M. Schinella, 43 South Park Ave. Easton, 
Ct. 06612; B.S. Nursing. Maryann T. Scifo, 163 
MacArthur Ave. Garfield, N.J. 07026; B.A. Psy- 
chology. Robert A. Scirocco, 635 Studio Rd. Ridge- 
field, N.J. 07657; B.A. Philosophy. 



138 





Nick Russo 



"Rutt" Rutledge 





Ron Saname 





Joan Ryan 



Mario Sangillo 



Bill Sarr 



WE 



Mike Ryan 









John Sakson 




"Saint" Santostefano 




Mike Schaetzle 




Donna Schinella 



Maryann Scifo 



41 

Bob Scirocco 



139 













V*-*- ■*•* 



A. <- 



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Ed Seage 



\ i 



Ed Seavers 





Doug Serafin 



Ray Shail 







John Sienko 



Jody Skelly 



Steve Smet 






Annette Speach 



Joe Speicher 



Terry Spencer 




" 



140 





Bernard Seery 



Francis Seiler 




"Smitty" Smith 



Marita Smith 




U 



Edward C. Seage, 585 Hamilton Place, River 
Vale, N.J. 07675; B.S. Biology. Edward F. 
Seavers, 224 New York Ave. Bergenfield, 
N.J. 07621, B.A. English. Bernard D. Seery, 
62 Inwood Rd. Trumbull, Ct. 06611, B.S. 
Physics. Francis S. Seiler, 36 West Church Rd. 
Lawrenceville, N.J. 08648, B.A. History. 
Doug/as A. Serafin, 1 5 Patmar Dr. Monroe, 
Ct. 06468; B.S. Biology. Raymond E. Shail, 
24 Coalpit Hill, Danbury, Ct. 06810; B.S. 
Physics. Kevin M. Sheerin, 3 Wedgewood 
Lane, Huntington Bay, N.Y.; B.A. History. 
William R. Sheerin, 3 Wedgewood Lane, 
Huntington Bay, N.Y., B.A. Psychology. 
Thomas G. Sheridan, 61 Oriole St. Pearl 
River, NY. 10965; B.S. Finance. Suzanne 
Shields, 62 Warwick Rd. Watertown, Ct. 
06795; B.S. Nursing. John N. Sienko, 270 
Daniels Farm Rd. Trumbull, Ct. 0661 I; B.S. 
Biology. Joseph E. Skelly, 44 Butternut Circle, 
Wethersfield, Ct. 06109; B.A. Politics. 
Stephen J. Smet, 9809 Singleton Dr. Beth- 
esda, Md. 20034; B.A. Economics. John D. 
Smith, 174 Union Ave. B7, West Haven, Ct. 
06516; B.A. Economics. Morion R. Smith, 59 
Buxton Rd. Bedford Hills, N.Y. 10507; B.S. 
Biology. Mary A. Speach, 100 Clark St. Glen 
Ridge, N.J. 07028; B.A. English. Joseph M. 
Speicher, 1 Hendrick Lane, Carbondale, Pa. 
18407; B.S. Biology. Helen T. Spencer, 1 12 
Newlands St. Chevy Chase, Md. 2001 5; B.A. 
English. 



141 



John A. Spera, 52 Harvest Hill Lane, Stamford, Ct. 
06905; B.S. Biology. Michael J. Spicer, 20807 
42nd Ave. Bayside, N.Y. 1 1361; B.S. Marketing. 
Pasquale V. Spinelli, 410 Dover St. Bridgeport, Ct. 
06610; B.A. History. Henry J. Spring, 226 Sum- 
ner Ave. Springfield, Ma. 01108; B.A. Politics. 
Alicia M. Springer, 1 69 Roxbury Rd. Garden City, 
N.Y. 11530; B.A. English. Jennifer A. Springer, 
169 Roxbury Rd. Garden City, N.Y. 1 1530; B.A. 
English. Richard Starkweather, 732 Warren St. 
Westfield, N.J. 07090; B.A. History. Claudia M. 
Stephens, 1222 Bronson Rd. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; 
B.A. English. George M. Stone, Jr., 5 Arrowhead 
Rd. Westport, Ct. 06880; B.A. Politics. Mary C. 
Strachan, 20 Daniels Place, White Plains, N.Y. 
10604; B.A. Modern Languages. Bernadette 
Strianese, 260 Elderfields Rd. Manhasset, N.Y. 
11030; B.S. Marketing. Gary J. Strickland, 52 
Polly's Lane, Uncasville, Ct. 06382; B.A. English. 
Mary C. Stronkowski, 61 North Main St. Beacon 
Falls, Ct. 06403; B.S. Biology. Joan M. Sullivan, 
20 Stearns Terrace, Chicopee, Ma. 01013; B.A. 
English. Marc/a M. Sullivan, 76 Linbert St. Middle- 
town, Ct. 06457; B.A. Modern Languages. Mary 
E. Summers, 7 Watson Dr. West Simsbury, Ct. 
06092; B.A. History. James P. Sweeney, 857 Ken- 
nedy Blvd. Bayonne, N.J. 07002; B.A. Psychol- 
ogy. Kathryn J. Sweeny, 79 Keane Lane, East 
Northport, N.Y. 11731; B.A. History. Marybeth 
C. Swider, 1210 Forbes St. East Hartford, Ct. 
061 18; B.S. Nursing. Mary W. Swift, 1 477 Con- 
gress St. Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.A. Sociology. 
Robert P. Tassinari, 8 Ivy Lane, Andover, Ma. 
01810; B.A. Politics. James E. Tatta, 146 Carlisle 
St. New Haven, Ct. 06519; B.A. Economics. 



142 





Mike Spicer 





Rick Starkweather 



Claudia Stephens 





Bernadette Strianese 



Mary Stronkowski 








Mary Summers 



Jim Sweeney 




Pasquale Spinelli 




George Stone 






Hank Spring 




Mary Strachan 




Joan Sullivan 



Marcia Sullivan 







B 




Kathy Sweeney 






Mary Swift 



"Tats" Tatta 



143 







Donna Tenney 



Harpo" Terry 



Craig Thomas 



Carol Torziano 




Pete Tucci 






Maryann Turme 



Judy Turtle 



Jean Vachon 




Steve Viani 





Vic Vigliotti 





Frank Vignati 





*tW* 



m 



Cheryl Vitale 



Michelle Vittori 



Bill Vogel 




144 





Ralph Tremaglio 



Janie Trozzo 





Larry Vagnoni 



Roc Valdes 




Donna L. Tenney, Chestnut Hill Rd. Sandy Hook, 
Ct. 06482, B.A. Psychology. Kenneth A. Tenore, 
172 Lockwood Ave. New Rochelle, NY. 10801; 
B.S. Biology. Raymond J. Terry, 1 Pasadena Rd. 
Bronxville, N.Y. 10708; B.A. English. Craig B. 
Thomas, 460 Camp St. Bristol, Ct. 06010, B.A. 
English. Carol A. Torziano, 723 Westfield Ave. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 06606, B.A. Modern Languages. 
Lucille A. Totaro, 57 Manor Dr. Clifton, N.J. 
07013; B.A. Economics. Ralph V. Tremaglio, 101 
Southgate Rd. Waterbury, Ct. 06708, B.S. Biol 
ogy. Mary J. Trozzo, 66 Old Westbury Rd. Old 
Westbury, N.Y. 11568; B.S. Nursing. Peter J. 
Tucci, 46 Exchange Place, Port Chester, N.Y. 
10573; B.A. Economics. Maryann R. Turmel, 179 
Fairlane Dr. Wethersfield, Ct. 06109; B.A. 
English. Carol A. Turziano, 723 Westfield Ave. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.A. Modern Languages. 
Judith C. Tattle, 22 Cottage St. East Norwalk, Ct. 
B.A. Modern Languages. Jean M. Vachon, 77 
Canterbury Dr. Ramsey, N.J. 07446. Lawrence 
Vagnoni, Jr. 1420 Billman Lane, Silver Spring, 
Md. 20902; B.A. Psychology. Raquel D. Valdes, 
1477 "Condominium Terre Del Mar" Apt. 801, 
Ashford Ave. Condado, Santurce, P.R. 00907; 
B.A. Modern Languages. Steven J. Viani, 862 East 
34th St. Brooklyn, N.Y. 11210; B.A. Psychology. 
Vincent Vigliotti, 37 Lilac Lane, Milford, Ct. 
06460; B.S. Physics. Francis C. Vignati, 159 
Brentmoor Rd. East Hartford, Ct. 061 1 8; B.A. Poli- 
tics. Cheryl A. Vitale, 1 7 Arrowhead Rd. Trumbull, 
Ct. 06611; B.A. English. Michele C. Vittori, 235 
Elderwood Ave. Pelham Heights, N.Y.; B.A. Mod- 
ern Languages. William J. Vogel, 806 Johns Rd. 
Cherry Hill, N.J. 08034; B.S. Finance. 



145 



Gary S. Wade, 42 Sugden St. Bergenfield, N.J. 
07621; B.S. Physics. John J. Walker, 1 Indian 
King Dr. Cherry Hill, N.J. 08034; B.S. Accounting. 
Robert P. Wallace, 1 04 Jerome Dr. Farmingdale, 
N.Y. 1 1 735; B.S. Finance. Christopher J. Walsh, 
994 Birmingham St. Bridgeport, Ct. 06606; B.A. 
Philosophy. Joseph J. Walsh, 63 Argyle Place, 
Rockville Centre, N.Y. 11570; B.A. Classics. Jo- 
seph F. Walton, 1 9 Hickory Rd. Derby, Ct. 0641 8; 
B.A. Modern Languages. Edward A. Was/7, 644 
Brooks St. Bridgeport, Ct. 06608; B.S. Mathemat- 
ics. Judith A. Wathen, 1 145 Ann Dr. Cherry Hill, 
N.J. 08034; B.S. Mathematics. Teresa A. W/'erz- 
bicki, 44 Sutton Ave. Stratford, Ct. 06497; B.A. 
English. Joseph A. Wilkinson, 591 Church Hill Rd. 
Fairfield, Ct. 06430; B.S. Biology. Marvelle Wil- 
liams, 1 2-A Malcolm Court, New Haven, Ct. B.A. 
History. Kevin E. Wilson, 50 Congress Ave. Shel- 
ton, Ct. 06484; B.A. Psychology. Kevin J. Winsch, 
8 Seventh St. Carle Place, N.Y. 11514; B.S. Mar- 
keting. Cynthia A. Wo//, 1 2 Kingston St. New 
Hyde Park, N .Y. 1 1040; B.A. English. Carol A. 
Wolven, 1 1 Powderhorn Dr. Wayne, N.J. 07470; 
B.S. Nursing. Gerald A. Wood, 79 High St. An- 
sonia, Ct. 06401; B.S. Mathematics. John G. 
Woodward, 73 Bainbridge Rd. West Hartford, Ct. 
061 19; B.A. English. Byron P. Yost, 16 Locke Dr. 
Enfield, Ct. 06082; B.S. Physics. 



146 





Gary Wade 



Johnny Walker 





Joey Walsh 



Joe Walton 






Ed Was 



1 


:1 

• 


; 




Chris Walsh 




Judy Wathen 




/ '5 






Terry Wierzbicki 



Marvelle Williams 



Kevin Wilson 



'Kev" Winsch 





Cindy Woll 



Jerry Wood 



John Woodward 



Byron Yost 



147 



Jan A. Young, 4 Brookside Dr. Monroe, Ct. 
06468; B.S. Biology. Carol A. Zahn, 225 
Tanglewood Dr. Trumbull, Ct. 06611; B.A. 
Psychology. Natalia Zamachaj, 280 Fox Hill 
Rd. Stratford, Ct. 06479; B.S. Accounting. 
Michael F. Zanderigo, 65 Guilford St. Tor- 
rington, Ct. 06790; B.A. Sociology. Paul J. 
Zavodny, 709 Burroughs Rd. Fairfield, Ct. 
06430; B.S. Chemistry. Janet Zelanis, 7\7 
Sterling St. No. Bellmore, N.Y. 1 1710; B.S. 
Management. Robert 7. Zito, 38 West 32 nd 
St. Bayonne, N.J. 07002; B.A. English. 





Carol Zahn 




Paul Zavodny 



148 









Jan Zelanis 




Bob Zito 









Natalia Zamacha 



Mike Zanderigo 






149 



PERSPECTIVES 




A VIEW FROH THE TOP 



Much has happened at Fairfield in the last ten 
years. 1,278 full time undergraduates in- 
creased to 2,584; the full time undergraduate 
faculty grew from 82 to 158. Seven major 
buildings were constructed: Regis, Northwest, 
Southeast and Fareast dormitories, more than 
doubling available bed space; the Campus 
Center, the Nyselius Library and Bannow 
Science Center, enlarging and vastly improv- 
ing the quality of facilities available for aca- 
demics and for other aspects of campus liv- 
ing. The undergraduate student body became 
coeducational. 

Alumni from the 1950's and early 1 960's 
find Fairfield greatly changed. Some feel that 
perhaps deterioration has occurred; they miss 
certain things which they saw as closely re- 
lated to Fairfield's Catholic character: obliga- 
tory religious practices, close supervision of 
dormitory life, many required courses in theol- 
ogy and scholastic philosophy, coats and ties, 
Jesuit dominance. 



In choosing to come to Fairfield a little more 
than two years ago I hoped that I was com- 
mitting my best years to an institution which, 
rather than deteriorating, was rich in promise 
for the future. Nothing that has occurred in 
the interval has caused a change in that ex- 
pectation. Fairfield has grown in size, but this 
has brought a more highly qualified faculty, 
an improved library collection and facility, ex- 
cellent science laboratories, and a fine easily 
accessible computer center. Our numbers of 
students have expanded, but this has meant 
somewhat greater geographical diversity, as 
well as the usually civilizing and consistently 
challenging and enriching presence of more 
than a thousand young ladies, and Fairfield 
still is small enough for friendships to grow 
easily among all of us: students, faculty and 
staff. 

The religious dimension of our life here is of 
special interest to me. Not for a moment 
would I wish to turn back the clock to the sim- 




pier ways of an earlier time when so much 
was compulsory. That may have been very 
appropriate for an earlier period, but it is not 
proper for the final years of the 20th century, 
particularly for the Catholics (the pre- 
ponderant majority of the student body) who 
are living in the post-Vatican II era of their 
Church. Each of us must face the issue 
whether his life day by day will be rooted in 
the faith-commitment, and whether his actions 
and words will so witness to that commitment 
that he will in effect share his faith with those 
around him. This witnessing includes the ways 
in which we deal with one another and 



whether we pray in the company of one 
another. 

The University's period of growth is for the 
most part at an end. Full time enrollments will 
not expand significantly,- little new construe 
tion will occur. It will be a time when we will 
have the opportunity to look more closely at 
the quality of our academic programs and of 
all our life here on campus. I hope that the 
members of the class of 1 975 will, at least in 
a limited way, be a part of that life, will al- 
ways feel welcome here, and will return 
whenever they can. 

— Rev. Thomas R. Fitzgerald, S.J. 








' J y.--v '• 

I 




zEEEE 




154 







155 



PERSPECTIVES 



A VIEW FROM THE INSIDE 



These two pages are Father Gallarelli's "view from the inside." 



156 



157 




3 f 




tmtl • 

ml i 






158 









159 



PERSPECTIVES 

A VIEW FROM THE BOTTOM: I 




Space was the main concern. While America and Russia 
raced jointly to explore our wisp of the cosmos before 
aerosol spray cans destroyed what was left, the basic 
Stag did his own slow burn high upon Canisius 3, as two 
of his more inconsiderate compatriots held summit at the 
foot of the stairs: 

"Wha' time ya goin' to dinnah?" 
"Five o'clock. I've got a big religion 

exam at 3:30." 
"Make it 5:15. I gotta see Dr. Azo 

about getting my chem grade 

changed." 

It being fourth period, our hungry Stag arrives at the 
cafeteria to find all the chairs beseiged, and indigestion 
right at home in the space of a thirteen minute lunch. 
With fifth period creeping up, the question of time ap- 
pears important only in terms of whether there remain a 
few seconds in which to have a second cup of that spe- 
cial blend, Good-to-the-last-roach coffee. The 50 per- 
son line from the conveyor belt answers the question for 
both freshman and senior alike: underclassmen, many 
leaving their trays behind, gulp down the coffee, zig- 
zag through the masses, and scurry on to class; while 
seniors sit back, prop up their feet, and savor their caf- 
fein over conversations of scoring either something, with 
someone, or against someone. As two o'clock ap- 
proaches most shuffle off, many leaving their trays, the 
space race being over for at most three more hours. 



Yet there were rolling acres (touche Aunt Deedee) in 
which to find respite from the hustle and bustle of the 
academic machine: be it lapping the track or the 
Schmidt's ("I coulda swore it was Coors"), exhilerating 
in the sweet air of Softball, or suffocating from the 
sweat of floor hockey; from traying down the gently 
sloping hills of Bellarmine, to seeing the first robin of 
spring decapitated by a Frisbee, everyone had his space 
at Fairfield (provided one went to dinner before five, 
and to the library before finals). 

The quest for space led into new areas of human 
achievement. Who would have thought it possible, even 
a few short years ago, for a man to live on Gonzaga 
ground floor— even with the advantages of being able 
to carry on a conversation with his neighbor without ei- 
ther leaving his room, or listening to the stereo of the 
guy two doors down, even though his own was on? 
Who could have dreamed of the erection of the Security 
Guard House (affectionally known as Checkpoint 
Charlie), the personnel of which dutifully scanned the 
contents of each vehicle entering Faredale after 1 1 
P.M., yet somehow allowed unlicensed townies to rifle 
through cigarette and candy machines in the fashion- 
able Southeast and Fareast dorms? Who could have put 
it past the Administration to further badger a member of 
its own faculty by zooing him inside a glass office be- 
cause "space is limited?" It seems that sense was ex- 
periencing a shortage as well. 




160 



-^ 




The spoce problem, however, was not merely limited to 
the great indoors. Any commuter could tell you tales of 
the early morning chase for available parking spaces, or 
of the inches that saved them from scratches and dents 
of rush-hour traffic from the Prep. Campus boarders 
could also appreciate what their off-campus comrades 
were putting up with, they often having difficulty trying 
to find a space somewhere within thumbing distance of 
their dorm. 

Even the space reserved for the parking of the Presi- 
dent's car was not held sacred, particularly by those 
who had small errands to complete in and around Ca- 
nisius, such as cashing checks, buying a pack of butts, 
or trying to buttonhole a teacher to explain why that pa- 
per wasn't quite finished yet. Not that Fr. Fitzgerald 
really minded it much: in an effort to do his part to con- 
serve our dwindling national fuel resources, it is said 
that he walked to work, though few people alive today 
can substantiate that. Some still believe he just ap- 
peared and disappeared at will, but this allegation also 
went unproved, with many doubting Thomases saying 
they would not accept such a story unless they could put 
their hand in the hole in his head. Oh, ye of little faith! 



Another trend of the recent past saw a shift from the 
exploration of inner space (as testified by the fact that 
the freshman class of 1975 produced only one Philoso- 
phy major), to the exhaltation of outer space via various 
chemical substances. In what most will remember as a 
relaxed and mellow atmosphere, the consumption of 
beer, whiskey, and wine seemed to be on the increase 
as the novelty and nose-thumbing connotations of smok- 
ing marijuana lost a great deal of its impact. In either 
case there was always world enough and time to throw 
a party, enough space to accomodate whomever 
dropped by, and enough refreshments to provide every- 
one with material for storytelling the day after. 




Perhaps the greatest challenge of space was one that 
few people experienced and even fewer stopped to re- 
alize. That is the yearbook itself. How best might a staff 
compile, in the tiny space that 230 pages afford, a 
record of the sights and sounds, highs and lows, the sig- 
nificant and frivolous events that went into the making 
of 1 975? It is first and foremost a reference book: one 
that helps us keep in touch with old friends. That part is 
as easy as it is obvious. The challenge lies in building a 
book that would suspend time, and span the space that 
will continually grow between our glory days and the 
ever advancing present. How this space was used and 
how well it was used are questions none of us can an- 
swer. Time holds court, and its judgement lies under 
many layers of doys, in a space that no one can forsee. 

Yet the lessons to be learned from the space race of 
1 975 should prove valuable in managing future encoun 
ters with both people and things. Given its proportion- 
ate space, each event should contribute to our further 
understanding of life in the 20th century. 







162 











< 




163 



PERSPECTIVES 



A VIEW FROM THE BOTTOM: 1 



Whenever the topic of college living quarters is dis- 
cussed, the first, and sometimes only, distinction made 
is that of living on or off campus. To most people it ap- 
pears that these are two sides of the same coin. Like 
many other distinctions, however, this is an over- 
simplification. The truth is that off-campus living is a to- 
tally separate and different facet of the college experi- 
ence, and as such lends a different approach to the way 
of dealing with the interconnecting strands of that expe- 
rience. Yet, mystifying as it first seems, the result of this 
mode— with all its beneficial gains— differs little from 
that of the on-campus resident. 

Under the broad heading of off-campus living there are 
two major subdivisions: those who live at home with 
their families, and those who rent and share houses on 
the beach or in town. For the purpose of clarification the 
former shall be referred to as commuters, while the lat- 
ter shall be referred to as off-campus boarders. 

To describe the life of a commuter as hectic is truly an 
understatement. While many people just rolled out of 
bed in Gonzaga or Loyola and right into class in Ca- 
nisius, the commuter had to allow not only for the nor- 
mal traveling time between home and school, but try to 
predict the traffic conditions both on and off campus as 
well. The race to the Campus Center after fourth period 
was just as insane as it was for everyone else; more 
time consuming perhaps, as the facilities of the Stag-Her 
Inn (ne Snack Bar) were a great deal more limited than 
those of the cafeteria. 

Participation in campus social life was also difficult. As 





opposed to an on-campus boarder or beach resident, 
the commuter still had various responsibilities as a mem- 
ber of the family unit. Couple this with the fact that most 
movies, lectures, and the like, did not start until 7 or 8 
o'clock, and you end up with choosing either to hang 
around for 4 or 5 hours after class, or driving home, 
driving back, and driving home again (quite an expense 
in light of gas prices). 

Another aspect which made the commuter inaccesible to 
his/her friends was having a job. Unlike the work-study 
employee, holding down even a part-time job called for 
the presentation of another of one's multiple roles. The 
duties and responsibilities involved had to be distinct 
and separate from those of school work, if both were to 
be completed successfully, and this too called for a 
great expenditure of energy. 

Yet in spite of this flurry of activity, there were advan- 
tages enjoyed by the commuter that just were not 
available to the other college residents. Such things as 
delicious home-cooked meals, the proximity of a ready- 
to-raid refrigerator, and the lack of blaring stereos, hall- 
way football games, or 3 A.M. fire alarms, did much to 
balance what others considered to be a lack of liberty. 
Furthermore, it was refreshing to have school be just 
one part of your life, instead of everything being tied to 
the University in one way or another. 

It was tough; it was hectic; sometimes, it was a real 



bummer. But all in all it brought the commuter to a pos- 
ture of maturity and responsibility that made it totally 
worthwhile. 

For off-campus boarders the scene was fundamentally 
the same, with important differences, however, in the 
duration and expense of their activities. Since most lived 
on the beach, a new perspective was gained on school, 
on life away from school, and on life in general. 

Such duties as cooking and cleaning were taken less for 
granted, as they had been in prior, on-campus, years. 
And while consideration for the life and pursuits of 
housemates was still as essential here as it was for other 
members of the commuter's family, the problems of all- 
night parties, crashing at someone else's house, getting 
up at a specified time each morning, the occasional, yet 
inevitable, nagging and lecturing, were of a different 
time and place. 

There was nothing comparable to strolling along the 




iaii 




beach at sunrise or sunset; of enjoying that calm of soli- 
tude so vital in maintaining the equilibrium of a person's 
life. Moments like these were daily lost to almost every- 
one else. 

For the most part, off-campus boarders had, at one 
time, been dorm residents. This meant that their contact 
with different people and events on campus was almost 
as strong as it had been in the past — certainly stronger 
than that of the commuter. This opened the door to 
more school related activities, and, as mentioned be- 
fore, if you didn't feel like driving back home, you didn't 
have to. 

One shared advantage between both was the separa- 
tion of school and home. Being able to get in one's car 
and head from the hills to the shore proved invaluable, 
particularly on those occasional days when nothing 
seemed to fit together (and don't we all remember days 
like that!). The importance of extracting oneself from a 
situation where inflamed emotions reign cannot be over- 
stated. It is tantamount to the proper functioning of the 
individual— physically, psychologically, and spiritually. 




Thus, although their lives were divergent in many re- 
spects, the commuter and the off-campus boarder ar- 
rived at much the same level of growth. Of course the 
pivotal point was responsibility: be it to school, home, 
family, or friends. The varied encounters of everyday- 
meeting them, dealing with them, and managing them — 
did much to initiate some and strengthen, hopefully, all 
these people in the form and character of their life- 
styles. Different lifestyles? Yes, superficially. Yet under- 
lying all are the worries and joys that are the quintes- 
sential elements of life on this earth. 



165 






166 








167 



PERSPECTIVES 



A VIEW FROM THE OUTSIDE 



As opposed to the four years that preceded it, our 
stretch at Fairfield U. was a quiet one. Although there 
still existed many of the problems that motivated stu- 
dent involvement in the late sixties and early seventies, 
a feeling of helplessness— and maybe even despair — at 
trying to find solutions to the many and complex mis- 
eries of the world resulted in a more self-centered ap- 
proach by students to the trials and tribulations which 
they faced. With Watergate opening the door to a flood 
of investigations, it was clearly visible that the ties be- 
tween the government, big business, and the military 
were stronger than most people would have guessed. 
And more influential as well. One need only look at our 
economy to see and feel it all. 

The problem of the economy was all-pervasive. Few 
troubles managed to sneak inside the sheltering gates of 
Faredale to concern its inhabitants, but money woes set- 
tled right in. The expectant rises in tuition and room and 
board upset few people; we were in fact fortunate that, 
while other colleges and universities had been collecting 
well over $4,000 per student since 1972-73, the cost 
of schooling at Fairfield rose less than $500 between 
1971-1975. Thinking back on the quality of the major- 
ity of cafeteria meals, or the Death Valley mattresses in 
Southeast, helps one in understanding where the cor- 
ners were cut. 

No matter how hard the student tried to ignore it or 
shove it aside, the stubborn greediness of the economy 
leered at his every step. Let us recall some of its more 
tangible forms: 





Books— With the paper shortage of 1 974 as a still reli- 
able excuse, the prices of books, particularly noticeable 
in paperbacks, continued to soar. Most students found 
themselves hurrying back to their rooms to get their 
checkbooks, while others hurried back to avoid being 
caught with any unpaid for goods. 

Keeping up with current events also became a bit more 
expensive. Subscriptions to the New York Times were 
up over $3 (to $18.60) from the preceding year, and 
hard-bound books by guest lecturers, which were occa- 
sionally featured, were generally in excess of $8.00. 

Fortunately, however, sales were offered throughout the 
year where a great variety of books were available at 
prices ranging from 25$ to $2.00. At times records 
could also be purchased at a cost of less than $3.00. 

Gas — The ravages of the Mid-East oil embargo com- 
bined with the double-dealing of the U.S. oil companies 
to result in the greatest of all the economic pinchers. 
Whether senior or freshman, campus boarder or com- 
muter, everyone was fully conscious of the need to cut 
back on higher automobile excursions. With a price near 
60$ per gallon, more people walked from Fareast to 
Loyola for their weekly linen, as did library visitors from 
Northwest. 



While the commuters seemed to have the worst of it in 
the fuel area, campus boarders felt its effects in a dif- 
ferent way. Many are the memories of February morn- 
ings ... up at eight . . . cold and sleepy . . . stumbling 
over to the heater only to discover that going back to 
bed was the surest way of getting warm. The heat 
would always eventually come on, however, regardless 
of the fact that most people were in class at the time. 

As the weather warmed, and the problem shifted from 
heating to air-conditioning, bicycles became more evi- 
dent. The year 1975 saw more of these vehicles on 
campus than any previous year, along with the added 
dilemmas of where to store them, how many chains one 
should use to secure them, and who to complain to in 
Security when they were ripped-off anyway. Its popu- 
larity was grounded mainly in its versatility. An after- 
noon ride through Greenfield Hill or to Southport Har- 
bor helped conserve fuel, get some exercise for winter- 
weighty Stags, and proved a thoroughly delightful way 
to appreciate a sultry afternoon. 

Clothing — Everyone was paying more for the clothes 
that he or she bought, as "shortage, " textile workers' 
wage increases, and designs a 16 mode forced the man- 
ufacturers to "reluctantly" raise their prices. In our four 
years alone denim, which once was the emblem of the 
concerned counterculture, tripled in price, by becoming 
the "with-it" uniform of the youthful bourgeoisie. And 
many a senior groaned at the prospect of having to shell 
out $120-plus for a presentable attire with which to 
face an onslaught of interviewers. 




Luxuries— The best indication of the consumer-oriented 
attitude of all Americans is in their continual buying of 
luxuries. This attitude was also clearly in evidence on 
our campus. In the bookstore, bubble gum was 3 cents a 
piece, as Pixie Stix. If one happened to be a nicotine 
addict, a machine could fix that problem for a nominal 
fee of 65c. It required 30c before a machine would 
vend over one can of soda, while many times the mid- 
night munchies would triumph over the outrageously 
priced 20-cent candy bars. 




A trip into the center of Fairfield did little to curtail the 
aggravation of the small-budget stag. The package 
store would yeild a six-pack only after ransoms of 
$1.75 and up had been received. A decent domestic 
table wine cost anywhere from $2-3, although such 
brands as Boones Farm, Ripple, and Great Bear could 
be had for a good deal less (it is believed, however, that 
only Stags who were already drunk actually bought 
any). The rise in grain prices contributed to an increase 
in whiskey prices, with most pints between $3-4, and 
fifths between $6-7. 

The buying and selling of pot also entered the realm of 
big business. Fond memories are the days when all 
ounces were either $ 1 5 or $20. It was not unusual to 
find the standard nickel and dime bags selling for $8 or 
$12 respectively. The reasons for this were that, with 
the more open attitude toward smoking producing a 
greater number of smokers, more people could be relied 
upon to spilt an ounce or two, thus doing away with the 
handling of nickel and dime bags. In addition, the so- 
phistication of smoking became more pronounced, and, 
if you wanted better quality grass, you were going to 
pay for it. 

So it is easily seen that the buying habits of your basic 
Fairfield student was not unlike those of anyone else: 
make what concessions were necessary to the basic 
items of subsistence, and save the rest to party. It 
sounded logical, especially in view of all the hard work 
that students thought they did during the course of the 
week. So what if we all spent a little of our bread on 
entertainment (after all, most first-run movies were 
$3.50 or $4.00)? It was all in fun. 

Yet perhaps our consumerism attitude needs a bit of re- 
working. Just as Dick Gregory said on the subject, 
"Something is not quite right when people complain of 
gas being 60 cents a gallon, and no one gets upset at 
Coke being $1 .00 a gallon." That, more than any other 
comparison, symbolizes the state of the economy in 
1975. 



169 




»\fc- 







170 







171 







172 







173 








175 







176 










177 




SPORTS 





It was a strange and disappointing year for the Stags: 
the coaching and personnel of previous years remained 
the same, as did the loyal following fans, but something 
was missing. That intangible "spark" which character- 
ized the N.I.T. Stags of the recent past surfaced only 
occasionally this season. Yet when it did it accomplished 
wonders, resulting in big wins over Boston College, U. 
Mass., Villanova, and Canisius. Enthusiasm waxed as 
the waning schedule led many to hope that another 
N.I.T. bid was still within reach. But ECAC division 
losses to St. Bonaventure and Niagara were a bitter 
drink to tournament thirsty fans, as well as to the team 
which had not had a losing slate since 1971-72. 








P$ 









This season also marked the end of college play for 
Ray Kelly and Ralph Rehn. Both had been integral 
parts of the tournament teams; both had fine years 
as seniors. Those of us who were provided with 
such memorable moments by Ralph and Ray wish 
them the best, and look forward to the triumphs 
which their successors promise. 





181 



'» 







.*/ 








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182 









SCORES (13- 


14) 


61 


Northeastern 


67 


74 


Manhattan 


86 


67 


Brown 


73 


90 


St. Peter's 


78 


1 10 


St. Francis, N.Y. 


87 


57 


Texas A&M ' ' 


62 


72 


St. Peters' ' 


73 


86 


Buffalo 


69 


76 


Georgetown 


65 


86 


Cornell 


76 


56 


St. Joseph 


63 OT 


78 


UConn 


87 


87 


SetonHall" * 


89 


79 


Manhattan* ' ' 


86 


91 


Hofstra 


64 


71 


lona 


70 OT 


74 


St. Bonaventure 


80 


76 


St. Francis, Pa. 


61 


80 


Boston College 


74 


81 


Villanova 


78 


61 


Ohio U. 


80 


84 


Cleveland St. 


75 


78 


UMass 


67 


95 


Canisius 


77 


72 


LIU. 


87 


73 


St. Bonaventure* ' ' 


78 


67 


Niagara 


72 


•* L 


ons— VCU Classic 




• • • 


Madison Square Garden Classic 


• • • • 


ECAC Upstate NY P 


ayoffs 



WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 



Unlike the Men's Varsity Basketball, the Women's Var- 
sity Basketball excelled throughout the 1 974-75 sea- 
son. The women showed their skills and competitive 
drive in every game and ended the season undefeated. 
Although the fans that attended these games did not 
compare to the number that attended the Men's Varsity, 
they were just as loyal. After such a glorious season, the 
women's team have high expectations for future years. 








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184 






! 





SCORES (16-0) 




64 


Conn. Coll. 


26 


54 


ECSC 


44 


68 


Vassar 


37 


64 


Trinity 


36 


51 


New Haven 


20 


56 


lona 


51 


70 


wcsc 


46 


59 


S.H.U. 


42 


43 


Yale 


30 


59 


Holy Cross 


36 


61 


U.B. 


58 


63 


Fordham 


46 


51 


U.B. 


37 


54 


New Rochelle 


18 


56 


Marymount 


34 


67 


SHU. 


38 



185 



HOCKEY 



This was a year of transition for the Hockey Stags. In 
their last season in the MIHL, they again dominated that 
league's play with a 12-0-1 record, taking first place 
for the fifth time in seven years and winning the cham- 
pionship for the third straight year. The Stags also made 
their presence felt in the ECAC debut, battling to a 4-4 
record in Division III, and just missing a play-off bid. 

Next year will see the Icemen concentrating solely on 
ECAC opponents, such as Weslyan, Holy Cross, and 
Bentley, with the hopes of a play-off berth— and maybe 
more. 






186 



CAMPUS »" 
.UN D.N.SC ROOM 












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Lunch. 

HOT DOCS 

HAMBURGERS 

DELI 

Dinner 

CORNED BffF 
KEF STEW 



HEAL CARDS 

NON TRANSFERABl 

\<i>A> COMHrTTEE 630 PM 

LVLRY THURSDAY 
fAfll.TY HEFTING ROOM 



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187 



RUGBY 



The Rugby Club completed its eleventh year of inter-col- 
legiate competition with a 3-5 record. Rugby consists of 
more than grueling Saturday afternoon matches viewed 
by bewildered spectators perched upon coolers of beer. 
Post-game parties including both teams and interested 
fans, play an important part in the Rugby scene. The 
Club ended the season with its annual trip to the New 
Orleans National Mardi Gras Tournament. 






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188 






189 






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190 






191 









192 



BASEBALL 



Indoor practice for the Baseball 
Team's challenging 25-game circuit 
began in early February. By blend- 
ing the experience of the ten return- 
ing lettermen with the promise 
shown by the incoming frosh, the 
Stags hope to make this their most 
successful season in recent history. 




v. • ^ 




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FOOTBALL 







194 







195 



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LACROSSE 



The Fairfield University Lacrosse 
Club is proud of the development 
undergone in its short history. Since 
the Club's inception four years ago, 
the team has grown from a one- 
game schedule to its present elev- 
en-game slate. The future promises 
even stronger competition, and the 
hope of varsity status. 




198 






199 




SOCCER 






1 



200 





TENNIS 




The Netmen, coached by the Philosophy Department's 
Renaissance Man, Dr. Joseph Grassi, faced its toughest 
schedule, which included Upsala, lona, and Coast 
Guard. The Team will also compete in the New England 
Intercollegiate Tournament— open to the top tennis 
teams in New England. 





201 



Under the guidance of coach Tamma O'Mara, Fairfield 
University's first Women's Varsity Tennis Team was or- 
ganized in the Spring of 1 974 and consisted entirely of 
freshmen. The Team's final 8-2 record was among the 
best achieved in Fairfield Athletics. With the growth of 
the team's members as this second season begins, and 
the team's impressive past record, an undefeated sea- 
son seems an attainable goal. 





GOLF 




202 



With six lettermen returning from last spring's 9-4 edi- 
tion of the Fairfield University golf team, the outlook 
would seem favorable for another winning campaign. 
Balancing this optimism, however, is the expected stiff 
competition from Yale (ECAC co-champ), Fordham, and 
Sacred Heart, and the fact that ten of the twelve games 
will be played on the road. 

Helping to sharpen the Linksmen's precision will be their 
annual spring trip to the University of North Carolina 
and Duke, and their appearance in the first New 
England Division I Championship at Dartmouth in May. 



CROSS COUNTRY 

AND 

TRACK 





203 



JUDO & KARATE 



The University Judo Club met on Monday and Wednes- 
day in the Southeast basement, instructed by 1 st degree 
black belt, Jimmy Kosch. AAU and USJF sanctioned 
tournaments in Meriden, Middletown, and Stamford, 
saw George Loftus, Lou LaPila, Vinny Ursone, and Bon- 
nie Ferguson place in their respective divsions. Through 
mental concentration and physical confrontation, a 
sharpness results which encompasses the total human 
being and benefits all aspects of his (and her) everyday 
life. 



The Fairfield University Karate Club is an organization 
dedicated to the study of Chinese martial arts. Through 
this medium the club strives for the physical, mental, 
and spiritual development of the individual. Classes in- 
clude lessons in self-defense, philosophy, and medi- 
tation, as well as physical conditioning and competative 
sparring. 

Although the club does not compete as a unit, the mem- 
bers are free to enter the various tournaments in the 
area as individuals, and many have done so. This year 
the club sponsored the highly successful Second Annual 
Shao-lin Ssu-Pai Lum Kung Fu Championships in the 
gym. A few spectacular demonstrations, in addition to 
top-notch competition, made this event an interesting 
and informative look at the Oriental Arts. 

Future plans for the club include a special self-defense 
course for the undergraduate women, increased in- 
volvement in tournaments as a group, and presentations 
of martial arts demonstrations for both university and 
community organizations. 




204 



FENCING 



For the 30 member Fencing Club, led by President Mar- 
low Farrar and Vice-President Ann McDonnell, this past 
year was a fine one. Competing in the categories of foil 
(men and women), epee, and sabre (men), the women 
defeated both their Trinity and Worchester Polytech op- 
ponents, while the men were victorious in 4 of their 7 
matches. The expertise of coach Branimir Zivcokvic, a 
National Champion of Yugoslavia, European Fencing 
Master, and World Class Fencer, was manifest through 
the tenth place standing which Fairfield achieved in the 
New England Invitational Fencing Tournament. 







205 



IHTRAMURALS 



The year's intramural program again provided the Uni- 
versity community with the opportunity of engaging in 
friendly, and often times intensive, athletic competition. 
The expansion of the program in the Spring of 1 974 to 
include Floor Hockey, and in the Fall of 1 975 to include 
Women's Tennis, yielded the widest range of intramural 
activity in the school's history. 




In the Spring of last year, Al's Place took the Men's 
Softball title, while Camp/on Champions out hustled the 
other women's teams; in Basketball the Budmen cap- 
tured the Minor league's crown and the Ozone Athletic 
Club the Major league's, while the ladies from Loyola 2 
bested all competition. The Floor Hockey Championship 
was won by Southeast (coached by Mark "Munch" Cro- 
nin) in a hard-fought battle against the Ooh-Yahs. In 
Tennis Richie Bailey copped the Men's Singles Title, 
while the team of Bob Giannini and Tom Kelly won the 
doubles. 



The Fall of '75 saw continuous intramural action, start- 
ing with Touch Football winner the Ooh-Yahs (captained 
by Jeff Martin) and Campion Champions (led by Mary 
Lou Reilly). The faculty showed its strength as Ed O'Neil 
netted the Men's Single Tennis Title, and the team of 
Joe Grassi and Mike McDonnell sailed to the top of the 
Doubles Competition. Junior Mary Jane Beagan saved 
face for the students as she took the Women's Single 
Title. 




In Volleyball the Zeroes took the co-ed crown, the 
Gawky Gazelles the Women's Title, and the Ferns Five 
(led by Jorges Vallejo and his amigos) wound up Fall in- 
tramurals by besting the other men's teams. 



206 





207 



GOOD LUCK CLASS OF 1 975 

FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 
STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



ft 



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»* 



BEST WISHES TO THE 

CLASS OF 

1975 



LEVERTY and HURLEY COMPANY 



260 Bostwick Avenue 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 



■H 

■ ■ 

■ma til 



Machine Tools Machine Rebuilding 

J.L. LUCAS MACHINERY INC. 



1 296 Kings Highway Cutoff 
Fairfield, Conneticut 

Tel (203) 259-3393 



DELMA STUDIOS 
OFFICIAL YEARBOOK PHOTOGRAPHER 



225 Park Avenue South 
New York, New York 10003 

Phone: (212) 677-7788 



211 



MEET YOUR 




RUSSELL CHEVROLET 



1055 Post Road 
Fairfield, Conn. 

(Tpke. Exit 22) 



Itntytitaintavti inirtiMttfM 




259-5221 



*SM-© 1970 Leon Shaffer Golnick Adv. Inc. 



— Sft=fcJ*&J 



Jill E. Toma's 



FAIRFIELD WINE/ 
LIQUOR 

WE'RE THE LITTLE STORE WITH EVERYTHING 

1431 Post Road 

(Next door to Blinns) 

Try Us 

Tel. (203) 259-9537 

Free Delivery 



212 



rau 
flanagan 



Heating & 

Plumbing 

Inc. 



Ray Flanagan 



290 Post Road 

Fairfield, Connecticut 0643i 

(203) CL9-2626 



PAUL S. YONEY INC 



MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS 

BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT 



SAMUEL J. 
KLAHR INC. 



Mirrors for All Purposes 
Screens Storm Windows 
Fiberglass Panels 
Safety Glass for Autos 



Insulated Picture Window Glass 

Plastic Glass 

Furniture Tops 

Metal or Glass Doors 



Phone: 334-7225 
Office and Showroom: 1 849 Main Street, Bridgeport, Ct. 



Werritt Parkway Motor Inn 




and 


CHEERS 


Hi-Ho 


TO THE CLASS OF 75 


Restaurant 


The Samp Mortar Liquor Store 


4180 Black Rock Turnpike 
Fairfield 


2480 Black Rock Turnpike 
Farifield, Connecticut 


E\il>> 4-4 and 4~i 


374-0040 


\Aerritt Park\\a\ 





BEST WISHES AND CONGRATULATIONS 
FROM 




;age based on German induct'/ Test Track Standards 




The only cars in the world 
that get 24mpg. 

Because it has the same type of steering 
system as the racing Ferrari and a luxurious 
interior like the Mercedes-Benz 280 . . . 

Because it has front-wheel drive like the 
Cadillac Eldorado and just about the same 
headroom and legroom as the Rolls-Royce 
Silver Shadow . . . 

Because it has the same type of ignition 
system as the Porsche 911, the same trunk 
space as the Lincoln Continental Mark IV 
and the same independent front suspension 
as the Aston Martin . . . 

Because it has all this— and also gets vir- 
tually the same mileage as the Volkswagen— 
that makes the Audi 100LS the only cars in 
the world that get 24 miles to the gallon.* 

AudilOOLS 

A lot of cars for the money. 
A lot of miles to the gallon. 




VILLAGE 
PHARMACY 



J. Abromaitis, B. S. AA R. Marusa, Prop. 

1460 Post Road 

Fairfield, Connecticut 06430 

PHONE 259-5919 

PRESCRIPTIONS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 



LINDQUIST SUPPLY COMPANY 



INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES 
BUILDERS HARDWARE 



383 Fairfield Ave. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 
(203)366-4361 



64 Federal Rd. 

Danbury, Ct. 

(203)743-5584 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



FAIRPORT GULF STATION 



TRAYNOR PORSCHE/ 
AUDI 



2269 Post Road 
Fairfield, Conneticut 

Tel. (203) 255-5921 



1101 Post Road 

Fairfield 

259-9117 



214 



The Fairfield Inn 

— Caterers 

Weddings & Banquets 

a specialty 

Cocktail Lounge open daily 

from 3:00 

Phone 259-0841 680 Post Rd., Ffld, Conn. 




THE FAIRFIELD STORE 



1499 POST ROAD, FAIRFIELD, CONN. 



Compliments of 



Compliments 

Savoy Laundry and Linen 
Supply, Inc. 

425 Woodend Road 
Stratford, Connecticut 

Liners Rented For All Occasions 



AUGUST BROS., INC. 



Fairfield's Most Complete 
Hardware & Supply Store 

1 860 Post Rood 
Fairfield, Conneticut 

Tel. (203) 2598336 



F.W. CARROLL AND SON 



Plumbing 

Heating 

Sheet Metal Work 

1989 Post Road 
Fairfiedl, Connecticut 



MERRITT BOOKS 

• 1484 Post Road 

• Fairfield, Connecticut 06430 

• Telephone 255-0658 

Books • Social Stationery • Greeting Cards 



Tki,. (203) 255-5080 





Fairfield Fish & Lobster Market 

'THE FRESHEST OF 
FRESH FISH & SEAFOOD DAILY" 



MUITWIE 

LISTING 

SERVICE 

MLS 



HERBERT R. SMITH 







1940 1N)ST ROAD 



FAIRFIELD, CONN. 06430 



HERBERT R. SMITH AGENCY 
Realtors ft insurors 

1438 POST ROAD 
FAIRFIELD CONN 06430 



TELEPHONE 
OFFICE 203 - 255-1 55 1 
HOME 203 • 259-3715 




Fairfield Floor Covering 
Shop 



1034 POST ROAD 



FAIRFIELD, CONN. 



259-9856 



ltj 

REALTOR' 



RES. PHONE 259-7037 



DAVID L. SAVAC00L 

Nationwide Insurance 

Auto - Fire ■ Life 



SAVACOOL AGENCY 

FAIRFIELD'S FINEST 
REAL ESTATE 



1150 POST ROAD 

FAIRFIELD, CONN. 

PHONE ( 203 ) 259-8311 



Rental of Lighting for Parties & Shows 



RAY BROWN 

Electrical Contractor 

Wiring & Repairing of 

Lights, Heat and Power 

185 Greystone Road 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

372-8971 



FairfieldLand \ IitleComiwu 

1 1 Oi POST ROAD FAiRfiELD CONN 06430 



Moreon L. Stoddard — President 



Mrs. R.S. Palmer 
Mrs. RD. Wells 
Mrs. T.I. Powel 



Mrs. D.J. Murray 

Mrs. F.E. Duguid 

Mrs. C.A. Cingliano 



Tel. 333-4 197-8 




imperial Agency Inc 

•• rvfY / rai »•' . \ rrangtnu 



l ft\ POST Hk ., BOX 21* - - ■ ■ ■ 



SELTENRICH PLUMBING 



Wholesale Distributors 
Sheet Metals — Plumbing — Heating Supplies 

1812 Main Street 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 

Robert Seltenrich Dom Correnti 



GIOVANNI'S II 



Italian Imports and Deli 



SPECIALIZING IN 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC COLD CUTS CHEESES 

SAUSAGES AND GROCERIES 

ALSO 

PARTY PLATTERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

FRESH (READ AND ROLLS DAILY 



LOCATED 1233 POST RD FFLOIO»> poit OFFICII 

TEL 23S'399S OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SUN Sam I 



JOHN E. PERHAM 
GUILD OPTICIAN 



Brick Walk 

1275 Post Road 

Fairfield, Connecticut 06430 

Tel. (203) 255-3605 




Vincent 
Brothers 



Consumers Petroleum Heating Oil 
Oil Furnaces LP-Gas Appliances 

808 Post Road 

Fairfield, Ct. 06430 

Tel. 259-5291 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



THE NAUTILUS 



COLONIAL ARCO 



ARCO 



2047 POST RD 
FAIRFIELD CONN 
06430 




TELEPHONE 
FAIRFIELD 
259 7558 

217 



*«ro*T* 



Heineken 



'HolkmJ 



AR,M 



BEER DISTRIBUTORS. INC. 







"Rolling Rock 

Premium Beer 









Schmidts 



RENTALS 



INSTALLATIONS 



SERVICE 



SALES 




VINCO SOUND SYSTEMS 

2472 WHITNEY AVENUE • HAMDEN, CONN. • (203) 248-0914 



218 



WELCOME CLASS OF 1 975 
ALUMNI BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Edmund J. Gubbins, ('51) President 
Robert D. McCann, ('68) First Vice-Pres. 
Robert J. Brennan, Jr., ('65) Second Vice-Pres. 
Joseph R. D'Agostin, ('63) Treasurer 
George L. Holmes, ('69) Secretary 



FAIRFIELD 
UNIVERSITY 



Paul T. Barnes, '67 
John P. Basher, Jr., '70 
Joseph F. Berardino, '72 
Irene L. Buden, M '54 
Brian W. Burke, '68 
Ralph M. Burke, '60 
Patrick S. Carolan, 57 
Kenneth F. Catandella, 57 
Anthony P. Copertino, 57 
Joseph DiSpaltro, Jr., '63 
Joseph P. Flynn, '62 
Patrick D. Foley, '72 




ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



James D. Gibson, '51 
Kathleen R. Graham, '74 
Oiarles G. Hemingway, Jr., '65 
David J. Martin, C '71 
Robert D. Mazzochi, '65, M. '67 
Gerard G. Michano, '73 
Robert G. Murphy, '71 
John P. Potterton, '73 
Thomas P. Richtarich, '74 
Thomas J. Ungerland, '61 
Alice M. Vail, M '53 



219 



SERVING MANY PEOPLE . . . 
One at a time 



ConiiectfcutNatioiial 




SUPPORTERS 



Fairfield Trading Post 
Nicholas Fingelly 
Fitzpatrick & Fray 
Cortigiano's Service Station 



Henry's Men's Shop 
Pike Diner 

Sid's Carpet Warehouse 
Town Cleaners 





the 


Best Wishes from: 


audio 




255-1156 store 


OPEN BOOK SHOP 




27 Unquowa Rd., Fairfield 


ADC Dual Fisher AR Sony 

BSR Garrard KLH TEAC Superscope 

Marantz Pioneer TDK Koss 




Maximus Nikko Pickering 


Phone: 259-1412 


2120 Post Road 




Fairfield 


OFFICE HOURS: 




Daily 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 
Thursday until 7:00 P.M. 


Closed Wednesday 


Saturdays until 1:00 P.M 




N.D. WHEELER 
optician 


Best Wishes From: 

GOLD'S DELICATESSEN 
HOME OF FINE FOODS 


Hentoge Square Telephone 
1700 Post Road 259 3876 


Fairfield Shopping Center 


Fairfield, Conn. 


Fairfield, Connecticut 06430 



OTTAVIO'S 



Excellence Is Our Mark Of Distinction 



Otto Veglio, Jr. 
161 9 Post Rd. 
Fairfield, Ct. 



Office (203) 255-6171 
Home (203) 374-5914 



COMPLIMENTS 

from 

THE RUSTIC GROTTO 



Post Rd. 
Fairfield, Ct. 



Best Wishes 




to the 




CLASS of '75 




Keator Smith, Inc. 1312 Post Rd. 


Insurance Brokers 


Fairfield, Ct. 




259-8331 



A FRIEND 



*JC»u 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Wim&t , - 



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CONGRATULATIONS 

Class of '75 



S & S DUGOUT 

3449 Post Rd. 
Southport, Ct. 

(203) 255-2579 



The 1975 MANOR 
extends a special 
thank you to the 

"DUGOUT" 



HERFF-JONES 



The Official Yearbook Publisher 



Mr. James Findley 
'Our" Representative 




223 





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Kathy Hofmann Editor-in-Chief 

Tom Ferrara Business Manager 

Terry Kowalski Sales Manager 

Bob Saloomey Photography Editor 

Tom Quick Advertising Manager 

Production Staff Photography Staff 

Rick Bertone Copy Editor Charlie Coon Assistant Editor 

Ginny Condon Joan Sullivan 

Gregg Guydish Lay-Out Editor Jack De Carlo 

Lucy D'Esposito Art Editor Tom Ferrara 

Ellen Sullivan John Walker 

Pauline Evans Gene Bragoli 

Alice Holowaty Rich O'Toole 

Roger Garceau Sports Editor Paul Moyse 

Larry Vagnoni Senior Section Bill McDonald 

Staff Assistants: Marybeth Carrie, Evona Scott, Pat Chesser, Lorainne Farrell, Bill Ciampe and Tom Sev- 
itski— cover design. 



The 1 975 MANOR has been an experiment and a challenge for all those that have been involved with its' 
creation. To Jim Findley, our Representative, who calmed me down with his limitless interest and concern, to 
Jim Fitzpatrick, our Advisor, whose help in creating a "decent'' office for the MANOR sparked a new in- 
centive drive for the staff, to Bob Saloomey who spent endless hours in the darkroom producing photo- 
graphs that are superior in quality and for his undying confidence in me, and to all my friends who spent 
hours in the depths of Southeast putting their heads together to give to Fairfield University, a yearbook that 
was fresh and unique, I now wish to extend my deepest thanks. Without a cooperative and dedicated staff, 
the MANOR could not have accomplished what I wanted for myself, my staff and needless to say, Fairfield 
University. 

Hopefully, the 1 975 MANOR will stand the test of space and time that A View From The Bottom: 1 so aptly 
mentioned— as that was our intention. 




\\dfluj WTW^W 



Kathy Hofmann 



Editor: 1975 MANOR 



225 




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